YouTube’s Spring Cleaning, Social TV Viewer Trends & More [Reel Web #40]

In this week's Reel Web, we discuss several online video trends and updates from the past week including: more updates and changes at YouTube, Comscore's most recent stats around online video consumption, Viacom's interest in social tv, and a look at some new studies that indicate how you can make your videos be more social.

Comscore Reveals Online Video Viewing Increase

As we discussed last week, online video viewing habits are increasing.  Comscore's April Video Metrix report shows that video viewing has gone up 46% in the last year.  The study reveals that the average American watched 21.8 hours of online video last month, whereas in April 2011 that number was just shy of 15 minutes.

More Changes On YouTube & Spring Cleaning

YouTube continues to make additions to their site.  The most recent is the addition of the Google + button.  It's a small button they have on the pages that will add whatever video you are watching to your list of +1 links on your Google account.  It works similar to the Twitter or Facebook icons that allow you to post videos to your social networking feeds.

YouTube has also begun to clean up inactive accounts.  This may result in your subscriber count dropping, but keep in mind, this does not mean you are getting less views – as inactive subscribers are not watching your videos anyway, but YouTube is just removing the old accounts.  In a few weeks YouTube expects to have these all cleaned up and then online content providers can get a real look at their honest subscriber count.

Finally, for those YouTube partners who were given access to the store feature, which enables you to sell items from your channel, YouTube is now also supporting CafePress.  This may be a better storefront option to use then what was previously offered on YouTube.

Viacom's Study: How Social TV is Influencing Engagement

Viacom's most recent study revolved around social TV and the way viewers are socializing while watching TV.

56% of the people that responded to this survey said that they used the TV shows or the network’s social app on their mobile device to talk with friends, to check out other clips, behind the scenes stuff to really just engage with their friends to talk about it while they’re watching the show live together. 54% of the people who socialized while watching TV said they do so through Facebook chat, through text messaging, face time or Skype or some other service that exists outside of the TV shows.  While tablets are still popular, only 18% of them say they use a tablet for socializing while watching TV and the other 82% say that they prefer to just do it on devices such as their phones.

What do the people who use these social TV apps say that they want from them?

  • 88% want more full length featured episodes
  • 75% want teasers of upcoming episodes to kind of see what’s going to happen on the next episode of the show that they’re watching
  • 71% want behind the scenes looks, kind of making-of and what’s going on that wasn’t really a part of the main episode like behind the scenes stuff

The study found the leading source of discovery of social TV services is through search (38%), followed by social networks (26%) and ads run on shows (22%).

QUESTION: How can you encourage social viewing for your videos?


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View The Full Video Transcript:

At this week’s look at the Reel Web your subscriber stats may be dropping, also we’ll look at some new studies that indicate how your videos can be more social and YouTube turns seven years old. All that and more coming up this week on the Reel Web.

Hey guys my name is Tim Schmoyer, welcome to another week of the Reel Web where every week we just highlight for you guys in the online video news from the week before. And this week let’s start looking at Comscores, the latest reporting’s about how online video viewing has gone up by 46% just in the past year. The study reveals that the average American watched 21.8 hours of online video last month, whereas in April 2011 that number was only just shy of 15 minutes. I know we talked more about this trend in last week’s episode so I’m not going to talk about it too much here today. It’s just another indicator that online video viewing habits are increasing and very rapidly, very quickly and the average duration that people are watching online is just increasingly growing. If you are an online video content creator it looks like you are in the right market.

Recently YouTube introduced a couple minor updates to their website. One of them includes the Google+ button which you’ll find below. It used to be just a tiny little button that you would click and it would just kind of basically add that video to your list of +1 links you have on your Google+ account. But now it’s an actual full-fledged sharing button, just like the twitter icon or the Facebook icon that actually lets you post that video to your feed on your social networks. Now the Google + button works the same way.

And the other change they’re making, they’ve kind of announced before, but people have just been starting to notice the effect of this is my subscriber count is dropping. Why? Well it’s because YouTube is going through and they are weeding out a lot of old inactive accounts which means your subscriber count might drop along with it. It doesn’t mean that you’re getting less views, because the people that who are watching your videos are active on YouTube and thus their account is staying intact. It’s just the ones who have had squatting usernames for the past four years and only logged in once back in 2006 or whatever, a lot of those accounts will be eliminated and removed from YouTube all together. So if you see your subscriber count start to drop a little bit that is why and the longer you’ve been on YouTube the more likely it is that you’re going to have some really old, dead subscribers and that your count will be dropping. YouTube says that their process for removing all these old accounts from YouTube will be complete by a couple weeks, so just kind of hang tight until then and you’ll see where your actual true subscriber count really is.

If you’re one of the YouTube partners who has been given access to the new store feature that you can add right on your channel and sell concert tickets, t-shirts, music downloads, whatever, well they now support Café Press. Personally I haven’t really come up with a good reason for us to use the store here at Reel SEO or my personal blog channels or any other channels I’m a part of but I have used Café Press before and if that’s a service that you’ve used, maybe storefront will be more of a viable option for you.

Last week YouTube turned seven years old. Happy birthday YouTube! And they announced some new statistics surrounding their site which are kind of surprising but really shouldn’t be to us anymore because we should just be expecting this thing to keep growing the way it has. Seventy two hours of video content are uploaded to YouTube every single minute now. That’s like three days’ worth of stuff uploaded every minute. That’s a crazy amount of content, and it just shows that man, it is becoming more and more and more difficult for our stuff to really stand out from the crowd which is why we try to help you guys with our creative videos on Thursdays. So if you’re not subscribed make sure you do that. The other updated statistic they revealed is that there are now 600 million views on mobile devices every single day on YouTube. So if your content isn’t optimized for mobile and you’re not taking into account that people might be watching your stuff on tiny little screens when they read your text or whatever you’re doing you need to start keeping that in mind more and more as YouTube consumption continues to move toward mobile devices.

The main thing I’m trying to figure out with mobile consumption is what do I do about annotations? I use a lot of annotations especially on the end of these videos that kind of point people to other past videos we’ve done and encourage people to subscribe, stuff like that. And the annotations on mobile just don’t work so I’m trying to figure out what to do with that instead. If any of you guys have any great ideas for me of how to maybe do that differently comment below and let me know, I’d really appreciate that.

Viacom recently released some research that has some very interesting results for those of us who are creating online video. Their survey revolves around social TV and how are people socializing while they watch TV on MTV or any of the Viacom properties. And the results are very surprising actually. 56% of people that took the survey admitted that they watch these shows while interacting with their friends. 56% of the people that responded to this survey said that they used the TV shows or the network’s social app on their mobile device to talk with friends, to check out other clips, behind the scenes stuff to really just engage with their friends to talk about it while they’re watching the show live together. 54% of the people who socialized while watching TV said they do so through Facebook chat, through text messaging, face time or Skype or some other service that exists outside of the TV shows. So not surprisingly though while tablets are still very, very hot it looks like only 18% of them say they use a tablet for socializing while watching TV. The other 82% say that they prefer to just do it on their phone or small, tiny device like that.

What do the people who use these social TV apps say that they want from them? Well 88% of them say that they want more full length featured episodes in there, 75% say that they want teasers of upcoming episodes to kind of see what’s going to happen on the next episode of the show that they’re watching, and 71% of them say that they want to see behind the scenes looks, kind of making-of and what’s going on that wasn’t really a part of the main episode, they want to see behind the scenes stuff. They’re also looking for ways that they can hopefully feel like they’re engaging more with the characters in the show, with the people that created the show and maybe even getting some rewards for that, some cool content or pictures or things that the general public wouldn’t have access to. They really just want to become super fans of your content.

So I think about online video, what does that mean for us? And I’m thinking we could easily make some behind the scenes stuff and photos of what we’re doing. In fact with these episodes of the Reel Web I’d love to do like a love Google+ hangout sometime while I shoot these. Just other ideas that you guys can come up with to say hey, I want to invite you not only into the content I’m creating but into the creation process and into the characters’ lives or actors lives or whatever it is that you’re creating, just find ways to make your stuff more social. I know a lot of us can’t afford to go out and hire a developer to actually build us a custom app nor do a lot of us have audiences sizeable enough that would justify that kind of cost in the first place. But there are lots of little ways that we can invite our viewers into something bigger than just watching these episodes.

So I would love to hear from you guys what ideas do you have for how I could practically work here on YouTube. Comment below and let me know what you think about that. How could you do that here on YouTube in a similar way to really get people engaged in terms of subscribers and fans and even just really big super hardcore fans through inviting them in and making your stuff more social here on YouTube.

For the Creator’s Tip video on Thursday we have another interview with Nathan Engle from WeUseCoupons.com and he’s going to tell us about how he sees that engagement on his videos on YouTube differs from engagement that he experiences with his massive Facebook fans or the millions of people on his website or the hundreds of thousands of people who are engaged on his forum. He sees that there’s different levels and kinds of engagement people have and he’s going to talk about how he notices that’s different for YouTube and the implications that might have for our videos and how we create our content. So that’s coming up on Thursday. If you’re not already subscribed make sure you hit that button up there. We’d love to have you join us for these videos and we’re actually adding another series, tons of stuff coming up here on the Reel SEO YouTube channel so make sure you subscribe. All to help you guys who are making online video content knowing how to make that stuff great and the best and stand out so you guys can all be successful. And I’ll see you guys again on Thursday for that Creator’s Tip video. Bye.

About the Author -
Tim Schmoyer is the host of ReelSEO's Creator's Tip and the author of "30 Days to a Better YouTube Channel". You can see some of his personal videos on his Family Vlog Channel. View All Posts By -

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