The following is the first episode of a new weekly video series that we're launching in conjunction with our friend and host, Stephen Schweikart of Vscreen.com.  Our goal with this new series is to expand the instructional content that we offer to not only focus on best practices for video marketing, but to also offer help with basic and advanced tips for planning, shooting, and editing video. After all, it's pretty difficult to market a video if you don't know how to produce one.

The show, which we're dubbing "ReelRebel," will covering everything from beginner’s basics (This one's pretty basic) - to advanced tutorials and techniques for those more experienced video pros - to product reviews for both hardware and software.

Why ReelRebel?  Here's what Stephen had to say about it,

“Our videos will be a bit unconventional…viewers can expect to see a blend of humor and satire in how we present the material. We believe that adding a different twist will not only engage viewers more effectively…but mix a little fun into the process as well”.

ReelRebel Episode #1) The Basics of Video Lighting

Note: Keep in mind that this is our first episode and as always, we want your feedback so that we can do our best to continually improve upon what we do each week.  If you have any suggestions for this show, please let us know in the comments area below.

View The Full Video Transcript

The Basics of Video Lighting 101: Beginner Tips

Alright guys, …so you want to make a video? It’s

about time! I’m glad to see you’re entering the

world of online marketing, even if you are a little

late to the game. First things first…let me help

you with the basics of lighting. I know, it seems

like it’s a no-brainer,…but you’d be surprised how

many videos miss the mark!

For starters—anytime you can film in natural light,

do it. Filming outside on a cloudy day can produce

a great video, AND eliminate your star talent from

squinting in the bright sun. The “Golden Hour” as

we call it, can provide almost film-like results

with the natural glow. Golden hour is the hour

after the sun rises, and the hour before the sun

sets, so if you aren’t sleeping or watching “How I

Met your Mother”….I suggest you wander outside with

your camera and game plan.

If you must film inside, have as much natural light

filling the room as possible, and add additional

light sources like overhead fixtures, floor or table

lamps and professional lighting if necessary.

Never position the person or object you’re filming

directly in front of a window however, or that

awesome natural light can blowout your shot. Also,

if you must film inside, try turning off your auto

focus as it can have a challenge in low light

levels, so make sure you look through the view

finder and verify that everything looks proper and

adjust the focus manually if needed, before you hit

record.

You don’t need to be a professional to make a great

video. As long as you know the basics of lighting,

sound and framing…..you’ll do ok!

If you don’t want to do it yourself, or you tried

and you failed…call us at VScreen….or watch more

tutorials….or have a friend or family member give it

a try. Whatever you’ve gotta do to get a video for

your needs, do it!

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  • MadeleineButler

    Great video! One thing to look out for when shooting in natural light though is that - as it's not controlled - it can change quickly, and you might not even pick up on it until you watch back the footage. Then there might be shots with lighting that doesn't match. Something to especially look out for during the Golden Hour as light changes quickly :)

    • http://www.videoleadsonline.com/ videoleadsonline

       @MadeleineButler Good point... changes in that lighting will make it harder if you are trying to edit together two segments that happened at different enough times from each other.

  • http://www.videoleadsonline.com/ videoleadsonline

    Nice Job... looking forward to more how-to production tips to help out our Online Videos!

  • MadeleineButler

    Great video! One thing to look out for when shooting in natural light though is that - as it's not controlled - it can change quickly, and you might not even pick up on it until you watch back the footage. Then there might be shots with lighting that doesn't match. Something to especially look out for during the Golden Hour as light changes quickly :)

    • videoleadsonline

       @MadeleineButler Good point... changes in that lighting will make it harder if you are trying to edit together two segments that happened at different enough times from each other.

  • videoleadsonline

    Nice Job... looking forward to more how-to production tips to help out our Online Videos!