Four Tips for Creating A Video Marketing Strategy For An Online Store [Case Study]

Four Tips for Creating A Video Marketing Strategy For An Online Store [Case Study]

A successful video marketing campaign needs planning and preparation to succeed. Laurie Eady, an online retail consultant and former Vice President of Marketing for Fabric.com, an Amazon.com subsidiary, spoke to members of the Atlanta Internet Video Marketing Association about creating a video marketing strategy for an online store, measuring the impact, and getting the intended results and more from a video campaign. These suggestions aren’t from a video producer, but from a top marketing strategist. Here are her top 4 tips for an effective marketing strategy, whatever the size of the campaign.

#1: Have A Clear And Realistic Goal For Every Video.

Laurie believes in writing down exactly what the goal of each video is and making sure that goal is measurable and trackable. So, creating a video her customers will find entertaining or informative isn’t enough. In 2010, she embarked on three videos: a homepage video, a How To Video, and an About Us video.

Four Tips for Creating A Video Marketing Strategy For An Online Store [Case Study]

The goal of the first one: to increase orders over $35 by letting online shoppers know about the free shipping on those orders. She created a video for the homepage of the website. A five year old boy walked out on the video and held up poster boards. The third one reads: Free Shipping on orders over $35.

The second video called, How To Sew With Minky Video, was created to increase orders in the product category by taking the fear out of sewing with this expensive and difficult fabric. The secondary goal was to show Fabric.com as a leader in the sewing community.

The goal of the third video, the About Us Video was less measurable than the other two. It was to show Fabric.com was going to continue to operate in the same friendly, personal manner after being acquired by Amazon.com. Online customers had expressed concern about the change, and the video would hopefully ease those worries. Other uses for the video included strengthening brand loyalty, educating new employees about the company’s history, and using it for the recruitment of potential employees.

#2: Have A Plan For Measuring Success.

Before Laurie spent one dollar, she asked herself, how will I measure my success in reaching the goal? In the case of video one, she would be able to measure the percentage increase of orders of more than $35. The homepage video is of a little boy holding up a poster board that reads “Free Shipping On Orders Over $35”. Before the video, about 40% of orders were for $35 or more. After the video, that number jumped to 75% of orders.

The second video “How To Sew With Minky” was created using a video spokesperson and images taken from Fabric.com’s blog. The goal of taking the fear out of the fabric worked. Category sales shot up 28%. This video was also used to engage customers in emails and on social media sites. It’s had almost 50k views and 117 likes. Fabric.com realized another benefit from the video, reinforcing the goal of becoming a leader in the sewing community.

The third video really was measurable by the number of views and comments. It was done with the goal of showing people that Fabric.com was still a friendly, personal place to shop even after the company was purchased by Amazon.com. Having customers watch the video and make comments provides constant feedback on how Fabric.com is doing and how customers perceive the company. The video has been viewed more than 18k thousand times and has 37 comments. Those comments continue to reflect the mood of the customers. It’s a great way to conduct an ever-updating survey. It’s also a great way for new employees to learn about the company’s mission and values.

#3: Ensure Success by Tailoring The Video To Your Audience.

Laurie knew in order to be successful, she would need to create videos that would appeal to her audience. She knows 98% of her customers are women. Most of them love to sew for their children, and they love dogs and cats. Knowing all this, she opted to have her five year old son do the walk-on video with the hand drawn messages. She could have used a professional woman, but she knew the little boy would have greater appeal. She also knew women who worked would not want an auto-play video with sound. The other advantage of the poster board is that the message could be changed out just by retyping the text. Not only did customers order more fabric, they loved the little boy.

#4: Have A Clear Call To Action.

Laurie tends to think about the call to action before the content of the video. In the case of the About Us video, the website was given after the video played. But, the How To Video gave a phone number and promoted the Fabric.com blog while asking for people to contribute to the blog. The walk on homepage video encouraged people to order now and take advantage of the free shipping. You can view the entire ATIVMA presentation below, Laurie Eady’s presentation is from 8:20 - 22:30

Laurie says keep your goals realistic and measurable and make sure you have a clear call to action. She believes in really thinking through who your audience is and what they like. She says your message should always be relevant and appealing to that audience. She advices keeping your presentation authentic to your brand and mission and finally tracking your success and considering what improvements you could make.

Don't Miss Any Stories!
Get daily online video tips and trends via email!
Posted in Video Marketing
About Our Contributing Author - Donna Davis
Donna Davis is the founder of the Atlanta Internet Video Marketing Association. As owner of Marietta Video Productions, she founded the organization to help Atlanta video producers stay on top of all the latest video marketing trends.

Google+


Please Note: Opinions expressed in this article are those of the contributing author and not necessarily that of

Become a Contributor: Occasionally, we like to offer experts within the online video industry the chance to write a post for ReelSEO. We like it because it offers you readers great content, and it comes directly from those in the field that are working on the technologies to power this online video revolution of sorts ;-) If you are interested in becoming a contributing author, please feel free to let us know. Read our post on becoming a contributor for additional information.

What do you think? ▼
  • http://www.WingersMedia.com/ Angela

    And as a video producer, I know Donna will agree with me, the video needs to be professionally produced. We've all seen the videos shot handheld in poor light with bad audio... that will not promote a positive image for the company. Find a video producer that has experience in this type of shoot.

    • donnadavis

      Angela,

      Absolutely. I always tell clients if they just absolutely want to do it themselves, then don't shoot anything. Just use professional photos or images and a voiceover. It's an easy way to lose brand integrity. So many companies that would never think of sending a handwritten pamphlet out to clients and prospects shoot a video that amounts to the same presentation.

      • Kevin

        How much should a small biz budget for when engaging a professional producer? Is it by video?

        • donnadavis

          Kevin,
          The budget really depends on a lot of variables, but I would say if location shooting is involved, you can estimate about 1k per finished minute. So, a three minute video would be about 3k. But, that is a very rough estimate. The About Us video referenced in this video was in that range. The other two videos were less but neither of them required location shooting. Hope that is helpful to you.