Teen Entrepreneurs In Social Video – How Video Engages Youth Market

Teen Entrepreneurs In Social Video – How Video Engages Youth Market

Want to connect with the youth market, which uses the Internet very different from adults? Then who better to get inside of the heads of the lucrative teen market segment than entrepreneurial teenagers? I interviewed Daniel Brusilovsky, one such successful genY/millennial tech entrepreneur with accomplishments in the mobile video space. We talked about on how businesses should use video with social media to do a better job of engaging with and marketing to teens online.

Daniel Brusilovsky was one of the speakers on the panel "Teen Entrepreneurs Give the Inside Scoop on Social Media," at the recent Social Media Optimization Conference in San Francisco. Each of the panelists were teenagers who had already built a success business around using social media to connect with the right audience.

Interview with Dan Brusilovsky, Teens in Tech Labs

Tell us about your early work in the online video industry.

One of the startups I worked for was the mobile video chat platform Qik (now acquired by Skype). We had just started dabbling in businesses using Qik for business purposes. What we saw more was freelance media producers for TV shows using Qik to do on the stop reports, without the need of a million dollar truck.

How do you define "social video?"

To me, social video is combining both video and social elements with sharing to friends, and bringing in friends' content. It's going beyond just adding Facebook Connect as a login option.

What types of "social video" would you say that your demographic is most attracted to from a consumer perspective?

For a younger demographic, the two big sites for consuming video content in a social function are still YouTube and Facebook.

What's the #1 thing any brand should be doing with video if they want to reach the teen market?

It's all about YouTube. YouTube is the #1 video site for folks under 18, in my opinion. Brands need to position their content to better understand their audience; and with the help of YouTube's analytics, they are able to do so.

What do you think brands, ad agencies, and creative agencies may not properly understand about reaching your demographic with doing "social video?"

A lot of brands position their content that makes it feel like they're trying too hard to appeal to teenagers, and it turns us away from them.

Teens are big on sharing video via mobile devices. Would you care to comment on that?

Teens carry lots of mobile devices. They let us access the Internet with 1-click, and they keep us connected 24/7. I can shoot and send a video to my YouTube account or my Facebook page, or other social media applications – and stay connected no matter where I am or what I'm doing. Teenagers have these devices on them at all times.

Are teenagers more likely to engage in or around video that's a live stream, than something that's pre-recorded?

It depends on the event. I know quite a few folks who tune into live events online if it's something they are interested in. Take for example, the MTV O Music Awards. It was all done online, and thousands of people tuned in, because they were interested in what was going on.

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What mobile video solutions do you like for the teen market B2C and B2B activities?

For me personally, I've been seeing a lot of people use SocialCam, from Justin.tv. It's a service similar to Instagram that enables you to share video clips with your friends through your iPhone and Android devices. Qik also allows for mobile video streaming (of live events).

More About Daniel Brusilovsky…

Teen Entrepreneurs In Social Video – How Video Engages Youth MarketDan is an 18 year-old entrepreneur, is the founder & CEO of Teens in Tech Labs, a company dedicated to providing tools and resources to young entrepreneurs world-wide. Daniel also works at JESS3 as a Strategist, working both with clients, and internal strategy, business and corporate development.

In the past four years, Daniel has worked at startups including Qik (acquired by Skype), TechCrunch (acquired by AOL), atebits (acquired by Twitter), Apture, and Wonder Warp Software. Daniel also advises Tatango and Taptivate on strategy and business development. Daniel is also currently a freshman in college at College of San Mateo.

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  • Miguelina Cubie

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