video camera

A video camera is a camera used for electronic motion picture acquisition, initially developed by the television industry but now common in other applications as well. The earliest video cameras were those of John Logie Baird, based on the electromechanical Nipkow disk and used by the BBC in experimental broadcasts through the 1930s. All-electronic designs based on the cathode ray tube, such as Vladimir Zworykin’s Iconoscope and Philo T. Farnsworth’s Image dissector, supplanted the Baird system by the 1940s and remained in wide use until the 1980s, when cameras based on solid-state image sensors such as CCDs (and later CMOS active pixel sensors) eliminated common problems with tube technologies such as image burn-in and made digital video workflow practical.
Video cameras are used primarily in two modes. The first, characteristic of much early broadcasting, is live television, where the camera feeds real time images directly to a screen for immediate observation. A few cameras still…

Screenflow 2.0 Improves Video Editing Features for Screencasting

Grant Crowell's podcast interview with Telestream's VP of Marketing Barbara Dehart on the new release of Screenflow 2.0 – the screen capturing software used for creating, editing and publishing as video file – on how the new version's enhancements will provide users with even better “business-quality video” than before.

One Biiiiiiiiillion Tube Views A Day - Holy Crap

YouTube is celebrating with a special celebratory logo stating they've attained one billion videos a day. That's a whole lot of ones and zeros if you think abou...

Report Urges Newspapers To Embrace Online Video

The NAA (Newspaper Association of America) has released a report that attempts to urge newspaper websites and publishers to focus more on internet video content...