video camera

A video camera is a camera used for electronic motion picture acquisition, initially developed by the television industry but now common in other applications as well. The earliest video cameras were those of John Logie Baird, based on the electromechanical Nipkow disk and used by the BBC in experimental broadcasts through the 1930s. All-electronic designs based on the cathode ray tube, such as Vladimir Zworykin’s Iconoscope and Philo T. Farnsworth’s Image dissector, supplanted the Baird system by the 1940s and remained in wide use until the 1980s, when cameras based on solid-state image sensors such as CCDs (and later CMOS active pixel sensors) eliminated common problems with tube technologies such as image burn-in and made digital video workflow practical.
Video cameras are used primarily in two modes. The first, characteristic of much early broadcasting, is live television, where the camera feeds real time images directly to a screen for immediate observation. A few cameras still…

flip1

Are You Flipped Out About the Flip?

Sometimes products come along that just simply hit the mark. Whether it's based on filling a business or consumer need, or for its ease of use, innovative simpl...
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Run and Gun Video Production Strategies for Video Marketing

Some marketers find themselves in a situation ripe for shooting video, but are required to do so with little or no time for preparation or pause. This is what is referred to as “run and gun” video production. To help explain this type of shooting (which is becoming more common for video marketers looking to capture real-time quality content), I interviewed three notable video production professionals.