Social Snap: The Sharpest Social Media Analytics Tool in the Shed

Social Snap: The Sharpest Social Media Analytics Tool in the Shed

Social Snap is an enterprise level social media analytics system that brings together hundreds of metrics from multiple data sources, allowing in-depth analysis of social media marketing performance and ROI. I’ve mentioned it once or twice in previous columns because internet marketers and video content producers need to analyze data from many different social channels.  We also need unique metrics that social channels don’t always calculate -- like True Twitter Network Size, Average Engagement per Facebook Post, and Blog Comment to Post Ratio as well as YouTube Total Post Likes in order to manage your social media marketing campaigns.

Interview with Nan Dawkins, Founder of Social Snap

YouTube Analytics alone can’t measure these unique metrics. And it can take hours if you need to dive into Facebook Insights, Twitter-specific tools, and Google Analytics Social Reports, as well.

That’s why you should check out Social Snap, the sharpest social media analytics tool in the shed.

That’s also why I decided to interview Nan Dawkins, the founder and CEO of Social Snap, to get more details about her product, services, and pricing.

Social Snap: The Sharpest Social Media Analytics Tool in the Shed

Nan Dawkins, the founder and CEO of Social Snap

Dawkins has over 25 years of experience touching almost every aspect of the communications industry, including conventional advertising and marketing, public relations, and digital marketing communications. She began her career at J. Walter Thompson where she worked on the national advertising campaigns of retail and consumer products accounts such as Burger King and Ford Motor Company.   Since then, she has worked in many aspects of digital marketing, including search and social, for clients across a wide range of verticals.

Dawkins writes a regular column on measurement for Marketing Land and speaks at numerous industry conferences.  She’s also a mom, ironman triathlete, and gardener.

GJ: What’s the backstory of Social Snap?

ND:  Back when we were a services company, we spent a lot of time on analytics because we felt that it was important to our credibility with the client and to making sure that the marketing programs we created were successful.

Then social media came along and we quickly became overwhelmed trying to put the data together to show that social media was worth the money.   It took hours – and sometimes days – each month to bring data together and analyze it properly.   And that, of course, just wasn’t profitable.  We needed a more efficient way of meeting our clients’ needs – and our own needs internally – for tracking and reporting on the results of social media marketing.   That was two and a half years ago.

Today, marketers are still dealing with tough questions about investing in social marketing – questions that can’t be fully answered by tracking Twitter followers or buying a subscription to a social media monitoring tool or tinkering with Web Analytics settings.  We are betting that as social media marketing grows beyond mere experimentation and evangelism, sophisticated measurement will become an imperative, not an option.

GJ: What is the biggest pain point that Social Snap tackles?

ND: Social Snap saves the analyst or marketer hours of time each month pulling data together from multiple, disparate sources. This is especially important to agencies and users who have to submit reports on their activities/results to a client or team on a regular basis.  Today, I had an agency user tell me, “You just gave me Friday back!”

GJ: What is the most important unique selling proposition for Social Snap over other tools?

ND:  One of the unique things about Social Snap is that it tracks all the way through to leads, conversions, and sales.   Another thing that is completely unique in the marketplace is the flexibility and customization of the system.  No two brands or agencies focus on the same metrics or channels and because we built the system with customization in mind, we can meet the needs of users who don’t want a standardized report with a handful of metrics.

Social Snap: The Sharpest Social Media Analytics Tool in the Shed

GJ: Let’s talk about customization.  Your website says, “Social Snap is a highly flexible platform that allows each user to create multiple custom reports using any combination of over 500 metrics from web analytics, buzz monitoring, web analytics and custom sources.” Don’t other tools offer custom reports, too?

ND:  Many tools claim to have custom reports, but what this means is that you can group a standard Facebook report (5 or 6 metrics) with a standard Twitter report (5 or 6 metrics) and a standard Google Analytics report (5 or 6 metrics) into a dashboard that is broken into sections for each report.   There isn’t any real option to combine whatever metrics you want into a chart.  With Social Snap, users can combine any metric from any data source into a chart.  For example, you could put traffic and leads generated by social media on a chart alongside total brand mentions, total Facebook reach, or total social media engagement (sharing across channels).  That level of flexibility is unparalleled in the marketplace.

Social Snap: The Sharpest Social Media Analytics Tool in the Shed

GJ: Are there any pain points for the client-side of big brands that Social Snap uniquely addresses?

ND: Social Snap covers multiple profiles: It provides reporting on multiple YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and blog channels combined (in other words, data added up for all Facebook pages, all Twitter profiles, etc. and displayed side by side) so that the user can see the total impact of all channels combined and compare which page/account/channel etc. is performing best.  Many brands have multiple twitter accounts and Facebook pages, which makes aggregating and analyzing data even more time consuming and arduous.  Having the ability to bring all of the data from multiple profiles into one place and slice it and dice it however you want is very unusual and not something you can get with other tools on the market.

We also offer a service that syncs social connections (followers, people who interact with the brand on Facebook, etc.) to a customer database (and can then be appended to Social Snap’s Influencer feature). This allows us to measure things like average sale and lifetime value of socially connected customers compared to customers who are not interacting with the brand in social channels

GJ: Data export is very important to analysts. They don’t want to be restricted by a pre-set dashboard or set of reports; they want to get at the data in a way that allows them to slice it and dice it. And white labeling is very important to agencies. What data export options do you offer?

ND: You can export all of the data through CSV, Excel or PDF (PDF's are white labeled for agencies).  In first quarter we’ll be rolling out the ability to download directly into PowerPoint.  We also have an API on the short term development list.

GJ: The combination of buzz and other metrics at a moderate price point seems to be very attractive to agencies. What pricing and buying options do you offer?

ND: Social Snap includes a basic buzz monitoring tool in the full license, plus an enormous amount of data from web analytics, social channels, and custom sources – all for about the same price as a medium range listening platform like Radian 6.  We also offer a reports only option for clients who do not want all of the features of the system.   Clients can specify a certain combination of reports and simply log in and pick them up at any time (reports are automatically updated continuously).

GJ: What about custom implementations?

ND: Social Snap offers custom implementations, meaning that we will create custom metrics, we will add custom data sources, and we will even take a particular feature and enhance it according to the end user's specs.  For example, we were recently approached by an organization doing various types of campaigns in many different countries. In South Africa, much of the data needed is coming from mobile apps; in China you have to measure the Chinese microblogging platform, Weibo.  I'm not talking about pulling in buzz data, I'm talking about pulling in data that we can create metrics on (number of mobile app poll completions, sharing on Weibo, etc.).  No one else will even talk to a client about this kind of thing.  It costs money (not included in the fee) but we are willing to do it -- no one else is.

We'd like to thank Nan for her time!  You can find out more about Social Snap here.

About the Author -
Greg Jarboe is president and co-founder of SEO-PR, a content marketing agency which provides search engine optimization, online public relations, social media marketing, and video marketing services.  Jarboe is author of "YouTube and Video Marketing: An Hour a Day". He is also a contributor to "Strategic Digital Marketing: Top Digital Experts Share the Formula for Tangible Returns on Your Marketing Investment" by Eric Greenberg and Alexander Kates; "Complete B2B Online Marketing" by William Leake, Lauren Vaccarello, and Maura Ginty; as well as "Enchantment: The Art of Changing Hearts, Minds, and Actions" by Guy Kawasaki. Jarboe is profiled in "Online Marketing Heroes: Interviews with 25 Successful Online Marketing Gurus" by Michael Miller. Jarboe is on the faculty of the Rutgers Center of Management Development as well as Market Motive.  He is also a correspondent for Search Engine Watch as well as the Knowledge Transfer blog. He is also a frequent speaker at industry conferences. View All Posts By -

What do you think? ▼
  • http://www.reelseo.com/author/grantastic/ Grant Crowell

    Says "the video is currently unavailable." :(

  • Greg Jarboe

    Hmm. I just played the video. The banjo music was strumming for me.

  • JoelinPDX

    Only $500 a month to use it. So, you need to be bringing in, what? $50K a month from social media to rationalize using this software? Just a little pricy.

    • HubShout

      Not sure I understand your point. If I were considering this tool from an agency perspective, I would be looking at at least three factors in determining whether $500 is a lot or a little: 1) Does this tool deliver on its ability to more easily demonstrate social media ROI... if so then extending the life of a social media engagement a few months would easily justify the cost 2) How much time does it save. Assuming I don't have excess capacity on my team, I can get more done with a smaller team. Assume your loaded cost of an analyst is $25 / hour (which is low), you break even if you save 20 hours per month 3) Do I close more social media engagements because my tools are better than the next agency?