Raystream Says They Can Reduce HD Video Streaming Bandwidth up to 70%

Raystream Says They Can Reduce HD Video Streaming Bandwidth up to 70%

Raystream tells me they've got a new proprietary video compression that can chop down the size of streaming HD video an average of 70%, without a loss of quality. You know me, I'm skeptical about numbers that large so I did some further investigation.

The crux of the Raystream claim is their new compression algorithm, which of course we can't peak into since it basically amounts to the whole basis for their company. But they say that there is no loss of quality in the compression. It's a pretty big claim if you ask me.

HD Video Streaming Bandwidth Reduced 70%?

Then again, remember when Netflix branched out to Canada and was fighting against the metered bandwidth as a lot of people weren't streaming and so Netflix dropped their stream size around 70% with a 'mild impact on quality'? They obviously accomplished a pretty large feat in that, but again lost some quality.

Here is what Raystream says they can do:

Before Raystream, a one hour video converted to 720p using the best compression algorithms resulted in files in excess of 1 GB, far too large to be streamed over commercial Internet connections.

Using Raystream, the same one hour 720p video can be compressed up to 90% of its original file size, which makes it easily streamable over connection speeds ranging from 0.4 to 1.0 Mbs per second.

Now do you see why I'm skeptical? It's a pretty bold statement. If it holds up, it could certainly do wonders for online video streaming and with the dawn of Ultra HD, which is coming faster than you might think, this could be the way that we all have amazingly clear and fast video streams without all the buffering or massive bandwidth needs.

In fact, I can see companies like AT&T attempting to buy this up and make it so expensive that most won't use it. As you know AT&T and Verizon are bucking for bandwidth metering themselves and both have already set bandwidth caps on their "unlimited" users. If Raystream compression comes into widespread use, it could simply kill their plans. That would be great for consumers and online video services alike, but I wouldn't put it past them to buy it up and try to limit its adoption.

So far, only edgefactory OMNIMEDIA (EMMY nominated special event video producition firm) and Laterna Magica (European video ad production company) have signed up with Raystream to date, but as word spreads, I imagine a large number of video editing software companies like Sorenson, Avid, Adobe and Corel and transcoding services like Zencoder and Encoding.com could be looking into incorporating this in the very near future. After all, we all want faster video streaming, better quality and lower bandwidth usage, don't we?

I'm talking with Raystream to get more information on their product and a demo. If their claims hold up under scrutiny, you can bet your backside I'll be carrying a torch for them.

Don't Miss Out - Join Our VIP Video Marketing Community!
Get daily online video tips and trends via email!
About the Author -
Christophor Rick is a freelance writer specializing in technology, new media, video games, IPTV, online video advertising and consumer electronics. His past work has included press releases, copy-writing, travel writing and journalism. He also writes novel-length and short fiction as part of Three-Faced Media . View All Posts By -

What do you think? ▼
  • Wes Moore

    Chris, I downloaded the video they have on their site and analyzed it. It has the same H264 quality as any video iPlayerHD or Vimeo or other HD video hosting site would use. And the bit rate and file size are consistent with every quality encoding platform on the market. This company has nothing new. They are a penny stock looking for traction, nothing more. Download the video at their site and you'll experience for yourself the inaccuracy of their statements.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100002443860880 Jason Young

    You need to do some research. Raystream is a penny stock pump and dump, nothing more. They don't have any revolutionary technology.

  • RogerB

    I believe the video download from their site is informational only and not a sample of their deliverable. The encoding/decoding for compression/decompression would need to be used and until it is a standard (mpeg, jpeg) an external device would be required.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1052784385 Christophor TheAuthor Rick

    I didn't say that their demo online was using their compression. You wouldn't be able to view a demo because you would need something that has the ability to understand their algorithm.

    • Sean Vermelho Adair

      their promo states: Additionally, Raystream HD video is H.264 compatible and requires no modifications to existing H.264 codecs, browser players, or even 3G smart phones and tablets.

  • William Caulfield

    http://www.beaconequity.com/smw/14546/Raystream-RAYS-Stock-a-Predictable-Dump-after-the-Blatant-Pump

    Raystream = Zombie company. Run away.

    • Roger Paulson

      Skynet?

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=37528323 Kevin Marinas

      If Mr. Caulfiield is wrong, I say that Metro Encoding should elect to not use Raystream's codec. Ever.

      Time will tell the truth.

    • William Caulfield

      I'm already using x264, and that's all they've got. What I mostly want to do is warn people away from the stock, though there still might be some room for a short:

    • William Caulfield

      http://caps.fool.com/Ticker/RAYS.OB.aspx

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=37528323 Kevin Marinas

      In case if you are viewing this comment on a different page, see Christopher Rick's article (http://www.reelseo.com/reduce-hd-video-streaming-bandwidth/) and his comment last month about Raystream's technology:

      ____________________

      "I had a web meeting with them and I'm waiting for an example video I sent them. it will be next week due to the short week."

      "It is NOT a new codec. It is a file compression technique that has nothing to do with H.264. It could be any video file from the looks of it. But I can't give any further details until I've got the demo video I sent them, because I don't really have any more information on it."

      "Source: Raystream Says They Can Reduce HD Video Streaming Bandwidth up to 70% http://www.reelseo.com/reduce-hd-video-streaming-bandwidth/#ixzz1h7D0OZfR
      ©2008-2011 ReelSEO.com Online Video Guide"

      ____________________

      So understand what that means. This is a file compression technique he is taking about - Read: It's *not* file conversion! Zip a *.jpeg, and unzip a *.zip containing that *.jpeg. Then you get that *.jpeg. Raystream technology is the same kind of thing, except it's not using a WinZip algorithm, and there are some losses after compression, whereas a technology like WinZip is lossless. Also, about 4 hours ago, Christopher Rick post the following article (http://www.reelseo.com/putting-raystream-to-the-test/), which demonstrates superiority of the Raystream compression technique for reducing the file size of videos with substantially less loss of quality from the original video compared to other methods.

      As for your reference to "http://caps.fool.com/Ticker/RAYS.OB.aspx", I don't divine the worth of a technology by looking at its stock price history. Such is an unreliable means of the long term value of a new company, let alone of the merits of the new company's products, especially when you are potentially dealing with a black swan.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=37528323 Kevin Marinas

      As it appears that I cannot delete comments in this thread, here is a typo correction for the petty who would wish to quote my statements with the word "(sic)" inserted into them as if that were to weaken my argument:

      Uncorrected:

      Also, about 4 hours ago, Christopher Rick post the following article (http://www.reelseo.com/putting-raystream-to-the-test/), which demonstrates superiority of the Raystream compression technique for reducing the file size of videos with substantially less loss of quality from the original video compared to other methods.

      Corrected:

      Also, about 4 hours ago, Christopher Rick posted the following article (http://www.reelseo.com/putting-raystream-to-the-test/), which demonstrates superiority of the Raystream compression technique for reducing the file size of videos with substantially less loss of quality from the original video compared to other methods.

  • raystreamIsAScam

    Raystream is undoubtedly an investment scam.

    Everybody who says that the download on the Raystream site is "informational only" and "not a sample of their deliverable" is WRONG. Let's look at what Raystream themselves says about their technology:

    "No playback modifications required (codec, browser player, set top box, smart phones, etc.)"

    This means THEY DON'T HAVE A NEW CODEC. PERIOD. End of story here folks. Their tech requirements state:

    "HD (720p) MP4/H264"

    It is H.264. That's it, folks. That's their groundbreaking new technology. You can get the same results with Handbrake. They are liars and scammers and I hope they rot in hell for cheating people out of their money.

  • http://www.reelseo.com/author/christophor-rick/ Christophor Rick

    That's a pretty heated response. Sounds like you're a bit bitter. Perhaps a fired employee that didn't get the stock option on the severance package?

    I've been talking with them for a follow up article along with some demos of the technology and I've got a much better grasp on what it is they are doing. I expect the article will be done within a week's time.

  • GN Hughes

    Sounds similar to that being described at this site ~ http://goo.gl/J5LsC Would be nice if these new "codecs" are more than vaporware.

  • MikeA

    So it's been a week, any further follow up?

    If it is H.264 then there is absolutely nothing here. If it is a new type of codec then there are all the issues that every new codec has to face related to scale of ecosystem, hardware support for devices etc etc

  • http://www.reelseo.com/author/christophor-rick/ Christophor Rick

    I had a web meeting with them and I'm waiting for an example video I sent them. it will be next week due to the short week.

    It is NOT a new codec. It is a file compression technique that has nothing to do with H.264. It could be any video file from the looks of it. But I can't give any further details until I've got the demo video I sent them, because I don't really have any more information on it.

  • Mike Leveroos

    As a recent rays stock holder with no bias info,
    the Raystream source code begins with x264- core 112.The maker of x264 said lol to the fact nothing was done to hide this.Im no expert but it sounds like at best they made free tech more user friendly and could be in real trouble patents etc. Anyway the stock is up 35% in three days will tank soon the startup partners +35mil.
    The short sellers will make a ton the common investor with no ability to short will lose.