Paya to Offer Creators More Money with New Video Content Licensing Marketplace

Paya to Offer Creators More Money with New Video Content Licensing Marketplace

Making money is pretty much what drives the majority of people working in the online video industry and so it's important that you're able to maximize the income from all that work you do when you create content. Now,  Paya, has a new-ish way for you to get more money from your work. How are they doing that? Read on!

What is Paya?

It's not an exotic fruit, that's papaya. It's more like "I wanna pay ya" I imagine, as in it's time for you to get paid.

Paya is a new way to buy and sell digital content. You decide what to sell,
set your own prices, and keep 80%. Turn your existing video channels and social network into a store.

So, basically it's yet another online marketplace to buy and sell digital content with a focus on video. However, the key differentiator is the fact that you can import content from Vimeo and YouTube (as well as flickr, facebook, and photobucket). Think something like istockphoto but for your video content. Another thing that separates it from other services is the fact that they give the creator 80% of the selling price which is higher than most creative deals where it's usually 60/40 or 70/30 (rarely). Personally, as a creative type, I hate giving 30-40% to a service just for the right to list my content, yeah, I'm looking at you Amazon Kindle...

How Paya works for sellers

In a nutshell, sign up for an account, import your content and then for each piece of content set some data and pricing info like; title, description, tags, price, content use rules, additional licensing, and delivery file format info. Once the content has a price, it gets published and can start being purchased.

Paya to Offer Creators More Money with New Video Content Licensing Marketplace

You can also set pricing profiles which are a set of default pricing scheme as well as licensing for certain uses. For example, some preexisting pricing profiles include citizen journalism, film & shorts distribution licensing, stock footage, etc. So say you have a couple different types of content you want to sell, you can group it up by pricing profiles and that will allow you to quickly add licenses and prices to the content. You can also do some quick batch processes like assign pricing to multiple videos, publish, unpublish and delete.

Buying Video Content on Paya

For buyers you can either find the content by searching on the Paya website or directly via their "Buy anywhere link" which allows you to put in an offer on content you watch on other sites.

Get Started

  • Use the search filters to find what you want on Paya.com
  • Find content on sites like YouTube, Vimeo and Flickr; if the owner has listed them on Paya, click on the link to go to Paya and buy
  • If you find content you are interested in not listed on Paya, you can create a Paya account and use the "I Wanna Paya" feature by selecting "Buy from Any Website" on the Manage Content menu; you'll be able to plug in a link from any site and create a request to that content owner to buy that content

Paya to Offer Creators More Money with New Video Content Licensing Marketplace

My thoughts

I have a life philosophy that stems from the 80/20 Pareto principle which, in a nutshell is that 20% of the work will achieve 80% of the desired results. The last 20% of desired results then require 80% of the total work, if I can do the normal amount of work I would anyway, and get an 80% return on it, I'm happy. Plus, I also believe that nothing is ever 100% in the universe except for death and even then, I'm skeptical. So really, the most I see I'm losing is 19% return (99-80), with just 20% of the total work load.

The fact that Paya gives out 80% to creatives means, I hope they expand to every creative media form available or I hope that the torch they are carrying gets picked up by other publishing services, content exchanges, etc and they all start paying content creators a better rate for the work done. Making $1 on something that is $25 retail means the creator is getting 4% return. Doesn't 80% seem awesome now?

About the Author -
Christophor Rick is a freelance writer specializing in technology, new media, video games, IPTV, online video advertising and consumer electronics. His past work has included press releases, copy-writing, travel writing and journalism. He also writes novel-length and short fiction as part of Three-Faced Media . View All Posts By -

What do you think? ▼
  • http://www.quietwatermedia.com/ JeffBach

    For me, what Paya is trying to do, quickly becomes all about how well the company can reach out and motivate enough BUYERS to come to the site and acutally make purchases.  In my experience and ymmv, this becomes an exercise in how much $$ the company can spend on marketing and advertising (traditional media, social, etc.).  This is the key differentiator between Amazon and pretty much everyone else.  Bezos and company chose to spend part of their gazillions on building awareness of their marketplace.  We all see and use the results of that today.  No one else, to my eyes (and unfortunately my wallet) has spent the money on building this awareness.  Consequently, the volume of activity on sites beyond Amazon is low and very few, if any of the creators are able to sell enough of their content on those other sites.  This is why, in my opinion, Amazon takes such a big chunk of the purchase price, because they took the risk to build awareness of their marketplace and now they get the reward.  Would you do any different?  Creators on that shelf space benefit from the visibility that no other marketplace can currently come close to matching.That being written, I'll certainly check out Paya and see if my content fits what they are doing.  I wish them well and hope for massive discovery and activity!

  • Nick Hope

    Part of the attraction of uploading my content to a stock media site is that I can more or less wash my hands of it once it's done and let the stock site handle the fulfillment side. With Paya, as I understand it, it looks like you don't upload the original file until a sale has taken place, and then you have to do it within 3 days. To me as a content producer this is a drawback, since I might not even be near my library to upload the file promptly, and to the buyer there is going to be more of a delay as opposed to the near-instant delivery they can get from istock, pond5, footagesearch etc..But the 80% is a good thing, and the YouTube/Flickr import is a good thing.

  • http://nextshoot.com/ Video Production Company

    It's certainly a nice alternative to the likes of istockphoto (and significantly cheaper - perhaps the lower commission is keeping filmmakers' asking prices down) but a quick search on a few terms we've recently bought stock off failed to provide the range or quality we'd need to be comfortable with. Good luck to them but they'll need to market harder to creators and would be purchasers to get the kind of traction their competitors have.

    • Christophor Rick

      Video Production Company They're fairly new yet which is why it came across my desk so I could check into it and see if it's something that might interest our audience. Looking at the comments thus far, it is of interest so it should see some rapid growth I'd imagine.

  • http://www.quietwatermedia.com/ JeffBach

    For me, what Paya is trying to do, quickly becomes all about how well the company can reach out and motivate enough BUYERS to come to the site and acutally make purchases.  In my experience and ymmv, this becomes an exercise in how much $$ the company can spend on marketing and advertising (traditional media, social, etc.).  This is the key differentiator between Amazon and pretty much everyone else.  Bezos and company chose to spend part of their gazillions on building awareness of their marketplace.  We all see and use the results of that today.  No one else, to my eyes (and unfortunately my wallet) has spent the money on building this awareness.  Consequently, the volume of activity on sites beyond Amazon is low and very few, if any of the creators are able to sell enough of their content on those other sites.  This is why, in my opinion, Amazon takes such a big chunk of the purchase price, because they took the risk to build awareness of their marketplace and now they get the reward.  Would you do any different?  Creators on that shelf space benefit from the visibility that no other marketplace can currently come close to matching.That being written, I'll certainly check out Paya and see if my content fits what they are doing.  I wish them well and hope for massive discovery and activity!

  • http://www.bubblevision.com/ Nick Hope

    Part of the attraction of uploading my content to a stock media site is that I can more or less wash my hands of it once it's done and let the stock site handle the fulfillment side. With Paya, as I understand it, it looks like you don't upload the original file until a sale has taken place, and then you have to do it within 3 days. To me as a content producer this is a drawback, since I might not even be near my library to upload the file promptly, and to the buyer there is going to be more of a delay as opposed to the near-instant delivery they can get from istock, pond5, footagesearch etc..But the 80% is a good thing, and the YouTube/Flickr import is a good thing.

  • http://nextshoot.com/ Video Production Company

    It's certainly a nice alternative to the likes of istockphoto (and significantly cheaper - perhaps the lower commission is keeping filmmakers' asking prices down) but a quick search on a few terms we've recently bought stock off failed to provide the range or quality we'd need to be comfortable with. Good luck to them but they'll need to market harder to creators and would be purchasers to get the kind of traction their competitors have.

    • Christophor Rick

      Video Production Company They're fairly new yet which is why it came across my desk so I could check into it and see if it's something that might interest our audience. Looking at the comments thus far, it is of interest so it should see some rapid growth I'd imagine.