It’s tough being a YouTuber these days. The site has evolved into an all-out competition for viewers where creators have to compete with passionate newcomers, established superstars and the growing segment of big-media backed channels. As a result, most YouTubers are always on the lookout for ways to solidify their position, grow their audience, and reduce the risk that comes with being a part of the entertainment industry.

This week, YouTube superstars The Fine Bros announced that they are offering a licensing deal on their “React” series to . . . everyone. It is the natural progression of things as YouTube continues to grow more and more indistinguishable from television, but the announcement has received a massive amount of backlash and public outcry.

UPDATE: The Fine Bros have announced they are reversing the decision to trademark the word 'React', and are releasing all past ContentID claims.

If you're unfamiliar with the Fine Bros or their famous 'React' content, here is the most watched one ever:

What’s the Deal with 'React' Licensing?

There are really two things going on in this situation. The first is that Fine Bros Entertainment (FBE) has applied for a trademark on a number of things relative to their series on YouTube. You can see for yourself the selection of what they have applied for by going to the Trademark Electronic Search System. Plug in “Fine Brothers” into the search and you’ll see they have applied for a trademark on a number of things, including “Teens React”, “Kids React”, “Elders React” and even the word “React”. While this may on the surface raise a few questions, it’s really nothing more than FBE protecting their assets by getting them trademarked. The purpose of a trademark is to distinguish one company from another, so trademarking their assets will allow FBE to have better legal standing against copycats that are deceptively titling their videos and shows similar to the “React” series in order to gain exposure.

The second component of their announcement is the creation of “React World”. According to the description of the announcement video:

"React World allows you to license some of FBE's most popular series (the specific elements and structure of each show), and use the trademarks. With that comes a suite of support that you can read about at the website.

We do not hold a copyright on reaction videos overall. No one can. React World is about licensing FBE's show formats, not just for shows like Kids React, but also others like "Do They Know It?," "Lyric Breakdown," and more. We're ready to change the face of entertainment and community - and do it with all of you"

After watching their announcement video, reading their announcement blog, and looking through their Q&A, it seems pretty obvious that their licensing deal is being carried out primary by creating their own multi-channel network (MCN). They do address this in their Q&A where they say that they, “are not an MCN from the perspective of what passes for an MCN these days”, but the basic format is there. People who join in on this licensing deal attach their CMS to FBE in exchange for promotion, guidance and media assets to assist in production. The new and interesting thing about how this “MCN” will work is that it isn’t exclusive, meaning you can opt in to it and still be a part of another network, and you can leave at any time with 60 days written notice.

Why are Other Creators/Fans Alarmed?

The most obvious thing that is scaring people is the fact that FBE got the law involved. Prior to this move, filing trademarks wasn’t really a public event. By making a big posting about it, declaring they have created trademarks and are licensing them out, they have thrown down the challenge to anyone trying to copycat their process and make a profit from it. They are not only protecting their assets, but they want people to know it. This has caused a huge outcry in the YouTube community, so much so that Reddit/Videos was forced to add an unprecedented 'flair' on many posts just to keep control of the amount of reaction videos uploaded.

The Fine Bros Backlash and the Problem with Licensing Video Content Screen Shot 2016 01 30 at 22.05.23 750x211

Detractors have pointed to series from VH1 and MTV like “I Love the 80s/90s” and “Beavis and Butthead who did similar reactions in their shows, claiming that FBE is copying off of an established format themselves and has no right to a trademark. Ironically enough, these series are owned by Viacom, who tried to take down YouTube in its infancy for copyright violations. And what about other companies like Buzzfeed, who have been similarly finding success with reaction style videos like the one below? How will they be impacted by a legal trademark by FBE? At a time when reaction videos are as popular as ever, some detractors claim that FBE is reaching out and trying to grab the whole market via force, which understandably scares a lot of creators.

What is the Reality of the Situation?

The reality is that a simple combination of gestures, to protect their assets and include their community in the process, has backfired completely. They have alienated their subscriber base by protecting their brand. Their only way out of this is to deliver on their claims, exactly as they have stated them. They will need to provide help and guidance to anyone that joins this licensing MCN and only protest other content that is a clear and obvious rip off of their popular series. If, as a result of their trademarks, random react videos are struggling to get through YouTube’s Content ID, it will only reinforce the idea that they are trying to control the market with legal action, even if they aren’t actively making the strikes themselves. Execution will be critical for FBE in this venture, as it could harm their core brand even more than just “React World” if they don’t pull it off correctly.

Is this Move Good for the Industry?

Relative to creators, I can say with certainty that I personally believe FBE is doing this with all of the right intentions. Every time I have heard them speak at VidCon, Benny and Rafi Fine have defended creators’ rights, spoken up against unfair MCN practices and generally been pillars of the YouTube community. I have every reason to believe that their intention is to improve upon the traditional MCN setup while protecting and extending their brand. To me, their intent is a good thing for creators. Their execution has yet to be seen. But if they can provide direct services that will help smaller creators learn the ropes and properly grow their channel, I’d say that’s a step in the right direction.

As for the industry, this scares me a little. As YouTube becomes more and more a global community, steps like these have to be taken to protect one’s brand, that’s just the nature of growth and “playing with the big boys” so to speak. It’s great that they are showing other brands the pros and cons of travelling down that path, it should give other creators something to look towards for an example on how to grow and license their brands digitally. I’m still unsure of whether this Is a good thing for the industry as a whole. Online video is a chance to redefine the media industry and it feels like they are walking the same path that has been walked before, rather than attempting to define online video as something new, different and better.

Therein lies the challenge for FBE. While they are essentially creating an MCN and attempting to build it with like-minded creators, what they create must be new, different and move the industry forward. Their biggest challenge will be doing all of this while maintaining the trust of the community, who is already skeptical and ready to turn on FBE if things look even remotely dishonest as they go forward.

The Fine Bros React to the Backlash

Update: The Fine Bros did release a video statement which has since been taken down. See the beginning of this post for a written statement.

What do you think of the issue? Let us know in the comments below.

  • analyzethis2

    Look this is a couple of youtubers thinking they need to knock off the competition. If you can't keep your channel fresh knocking off others in the same genre is utterly senseless.

  • http://www.parkablogs.com/ Teoh Yi Chie

    Seems like they have turned off comments display to that announcement video.

    I don't even know how to react to that video. And because they have licensed the concept. I can't even make a react video in response to that video. Isn't that like..... censorship? If I interview soccer players, does that mean I can license the act of interviewing soccer players?

    • Faxe Jensen

      You can make a reaction video.
      Just don't copy their entire format.
      If you set up a show interviewing soccer players in a certain way, and it reaches popularity, others will copy your format, because it is successful. A trademark will tell them: "Don't be lazy. Make your own style of show interviewing soccer players."

  • Bonsky

    The key problem here, is that the mechanism by which they get to protect and enforce their trademark is the same broken and unaccountable pile of crap that youtube uses for all the other enforcement. If you get a false claim, you have to go through the same pointless exercise to contest it. The only way to demonstrate any good will is to either require manual review (rather than bot review) before issuing notices -- or to create a speedy and transparent way for people to contest invalid claims outside of the youtube process in order to demonstrate what they are truly trying to enforce.

    Without that, it looks like a cash grab -- because that is how the system is designed. Flag it all, and ignore it until the timer runs out.

    • Andy Smith

      And I think that's the bigger issue in all of this. The system that it works in conjunction with is too easily abused. The idea that FBE could flag anything with certain tags, titles or descriptions is absolutely terrifying! That's partly YouTube's fault for how the system is built and I think this fiasco will cause them to put some effort into updating it this year.

    • http://www.thelionsdennews.com Andy Smith

      The content ID system is definitely a huge (broken) part of everyone's worries. If it worked correctly, there would be no worry about somebody doing exactly what they did, because 9 times out of 10 (or more) their trademark wouldn't apply because the usage of react is much too general. But since they've cancelled it I suppose none of that matters.

  • Tim

    They probably thought since they already have such a
    huge staff that this was a way to farm out more of these without it
    costing them anything. Noob gets template from Fine Bros, slaps one
    together, gets production approved, PROFIT! Most people don't understand the behind the scenes of what's happening and are probably overreacting ($)

    • Andy Smith

      I think you are probably right Tim!

    • http://www.thelionsdennews.com Andy Smith

      I'm glad I'm not them right now, that's for sure. But I imagine they will recover from this just fine.

  • Adam Evans (Adadave)

    I didn't hear them say anything about trademarking though... I mean, they pretty much described a channel network that you could join or not join. And they're being pretty honest in this video. All of the other videos taken down might've been a mistake, it's not like tfb themselves went and flagged all of them, maybe other users did...

    • Andy Smith

      Mentioning their trademarks was the bigger mistake I think. Other than that they are just making a network and encouraging people to join it and make "react" videos. I'd be shocked if the majority of the videos that have been flagged were flagged by them. I think it would be more likely that those videos are a victim of the Content ID system.

    • http://www.thelionsdennews.com Andy Smith

      I'm actually quite shocked they are undoing everything right now. I get the trademark part, but their concept behind React World actually did sound beneficial to smaller creators/fans of their series.

  • Randy

    Honestly I feel like if enough people were to take up a serious legal dispute against TFB on the exact basis this article was eritten on, the trademark could be revoked and TFB would at the very least end up with loads of egg on their faces, and at the most banned off of YouTube and/or fined heavily for some sort of fraud related to this whole fiasco. It'd be understandable if they'd put up a non-generic sort of format in terms of content (like a lot of Rooster Teeth has up), but reaction videos? Reall They think they'll get away with trademarking a HUGELY generic video type without a major dent in their fanbase (and subsequently their pocketbooks), and without a massive backlash and PR nightmare? Maybe they'll learn from this. Let's hope their following dwindles so they see how stupid they're being about this.

    • Andy Smith

      Even if they somehow got the "react" trademark granted, I think it would fizzle quickly. It is too general a term and they would have a very difficult time defending the trademark I think. If they didn't defend it, they would lose it. It would become quite expensive in more ways than one. Who knows, perhaps the next video is them announcing they have fired the legal team that gave them the advice to go forward as they have.

    • http://www.thelionsdennews.com Andy Smith

      They absolutely learned quickly. I wonder what the lasting impact of how this whole scenario played out will be. Certainly creators learned not to trademark concepts/formats, but I think we also learned that a very loud group of viewers/creators can directly impact business decisions.

  • Denny Crane

    #unsubfinebros

  • Brian L.

    "It’s tough being a YouTuber these days."

    Welp, it that isn't the most first-world, Millennial-era thing I've ever heard as an opening line to an article.

    • Carla Marshall

      You know you're reading ReelSEO, right?

    • Andy Smith

      Haha! That line got revised quite a few times. You should have seen some of the other openers! I believe one even had the word pitchfork in it.

    • http://www.thelionsdennews.com Andy Smith

      I had a number of other openers, some of which included "pitchforks". This one seemed to work the best ;).

  • lanmanna

    I've never been a fan of watching people watching a video. Way too meta.

    • Andy Smith

      I used to watch far less reaction videos myself, but now I'm using them as a great means of content discovery. Especially when people react to 10-20 videos in the same reaction video. There is so much content out there it's hard to watch it all!

    • http://www.thelionsdennews.com Andy Smith

      Some people are good at making it entertaining enough that you almost get a 2 for 1. I'd actually count the Fine Bros in that department. That's not always the case, but as discovery gets a little bit more difficult (for me anyway) people who aggregate viral videos into a react video help me discover new content.

  • BarryDunne

    Glad I ain't a subscriber. They're losing people. More people that subscribe the better. The guys are freaking out cause they'll lose money with less people subscribing and watching.

    • Andy Smith

      When your business depends on the support of your community like YouTubers' videos do, this sort of negative press takes a much bigger toll on your channel. You can just see it in their faces in their update video. I doubt they had any ill intentions at all, but it's going to be a tough lesson to learn, especially for how big they have become.

    • http://www.thelionsdennews.com Andy Smith

      They definitely looked worse for wear in that apology update. When your livelihood depends on subscribers/views like it does, bad PR tends to cut a little deeper.

      • BarryDunne

        I'm a youtuber too. I haven't got as many as they do of course but I still have a day job. They may start looking! Haha

  • disqus_5D5by9QRUE

    What's going to stop someone from trademarking "recipe" or "do it yourself" or "News" and trying to keep it for themselves. You're essentially going to make a community a millions of creators and your going to narrow it down to a few.. I don't believe that would happen but that's what people are afraid of. Youtube got so big because you watch what you want from whomever you wanted to.

    Maybe you're not a fan of the Finebros presentation of their react videos and like someone else's edgier version of it. You're telling me I wouldn't be able to see the other channel's vid's because the Fine Bros took to the law to protect their brand? You're telling what I want to watch is now being controlled? No one tells me how I should spend my free time.. And you know other big channels are observing what's happening with the Fine Bros thinking of doing the same thing themselves, they are just gonna wait and see how this all turns out for them and learn what and what not to do..

    Netflix and Qwikster folks Netflix and Qwikster..

    • Andy Smith

      In the end I don't think their "react" trademark is going to hold up. Just as none of those other general trademarks would either. It's going to be an expensive lesson in more ways than one, but they are going to learn and pay it for all creators.

    • Faxe Jensen

      "What's going to stop someone from trademarking "recipe" or "do it yourself" or "News" and trying to keep it for themselves. "
      The same thing that stops the Fine Brothers from doing what idiots are nonetheless claiming that they are going to do:
      The law.
      You can't trademark a concept.
      You actually proved it yourself. In the world we live in, you don't think someone would have already tried that kind of thing if it was possible?
      It's like saying there is only one game show on TV, because Wheel of Fortune trademarked the concept. - No, they trademarked a format.
      It's like saying there is only one talent show on TV, because American Idol trademarked the concept. - No, they trademarked a format...

      • josep luna

        Stop posting please! no one cares about you

        • Faxe Jensen

          I know. That's why I didn't get a reply... Wait...

    • http://www.thelionsdennews.com Andy Smith

      Looks like they learned from their mistakes very quickly.

  • DickoryHickoryDuck

    A youtuber had his reaction video reacting to the fine bros videos flagged and taken down

    Youtuber with 114 subs has his react video taken down

    This one they lost and it happened last year

    read the description for the full details.

    For the ellen degenrees one

    https://www.reddit.com/r/videos/comments/43e6a9/link_inside_in_2014_the_fine_bros_told_its/

    They attacked ellen for what they think was a similar concept, showing kids old tech.

    fun fact before elders react, there was an earlier series called seniors react that was mysteriously taken down, read all about it

    https://www.reddit.com/r/videos/comments/43fdw3/seniors_react_originally_posted_apr_3_2012_was/

    There are plenty more but im lazy, so find em yourself.

    And here are 6 of the trademark applications not including the other 3 or 4 shows

    http://www.tmfile.com/owner/fi/fine-brothers-properties,inc28.php

    The word REACT is number 3.

    For paper work for the word react here is a closer look :

    http://tsdr.uspto.gov/documentviewer?caseId=sn86689364&docId=NOP20160113074621#docIndex=1&page=1

    An attorney offering free bono to content creators who want to oppose

    A youtuber had his reaction video reacting to the fine bros videos flagged and taken down

    Youtuber with 114 subs has his react video taken down

    This one they lost and it happened last year

    read the description for the full details.

    For the ellen degenrees one

    https://www.reddit.com/r/videos/comments/43e6a9/link_inside_in_2014_the_fine_bros_told_its/

    They attacked ellen for what they think was a similar concept, showing kids old tech.

    fun fact before elders react, there was an earlier series called seniors react that was mysteriously taken down, read all about it

    https://www.reddit.com/r/videos/comments/43fdw3/seniors_react_originally_posted_apr_3_2012_was/

    There are plenty more but im lazy, so find em yourself.

    And here are 6 of the trademark applications not including the other 3 or 4 shows

    http://www.tmfile.com/owner/fi/fine-brothers-properties,inc28.php

    The word REACT is number 3.

    For paper work for the word react here is a closer look :

    http://tsdr.uspto.gov/documentviewer?caseId=sn86689364&docId=NOP20160113074621#docIndex=1&page=1

    An attorney offering pro bono help to content creators who want to oppose

    http://ryanmorrisonlaw.com/attorneys-react-the-fine-bros-react-trademark/

  • BarryDennen12

    They are gross. I always had a feeling, but now I know for sure.

    • Andy Smith

      I get the feeling they may have listened to some bad advice on this one.

  • http://carlospache.co/ Carlos Pacheco

    This is what happens with traditional media licensing thinking( and lawyers )try to impose they're ways and rules around content. I don't believe the same ownership rules apply when a series or idea is created based on, sourced and supported by the community. Are the kids overreacting? Kinda... but this could be the first step down a dark path for creativity and community support.

    • Andy Smith

      Absolutely a dark path. As part of this whole discussion I've seen <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EaVy_QCa1RQ">this video</a> tossed around. And I think it really does a great job explaining why somebody might not WANT to make a trademark. But then that would probably undermine their efforts of React World a bit. They should have just called it an MCN, said they were only looking for people interested in making React videos and left all the trademark business out of this entirely.

    • http://www.thelionsdennews.com Andy Smith

      I actually think this trademark business was the wrong path. Makes sense to me why they did it, but I'm glad they cancelled them, especially the react one. What's worrisome is that the mob mentality was able to get them to make a business decision. The hate mongering was so intense even people who stood up for them were getting hit in the comments with nastygrams.

  • http://www.JoshRimer.com/ Josh Rimer

    I remember someone having their videos taken down a year ago because the Fine Bros were claiming copyright on them so that part isn't new - now his videos just could stay up if he gives them 50% of the revenue basically.

    My concern is with the wideness of what can be claimed as a react video. This guy wasn't using their logos or name or exact same setup, so if he wanted to actually do the same series it would make sense, but not if he wants to do a different version that just has people reacting to videos.

    Where will it go next? Matthew Santoro will claim ownership to all top 10 videos? It needs to be more narrow, just like on TV. If you want "______ has talent" then you pay because it's the exact same name/premise/format but in your country, but they don't get to claim "The X Factor" just because it's also a national talent show.

    • FINEbro$

      A youtuber had his reaction video reacting to the fine bros videos flagged and taken down

      Youtuber with 114 subs has his react video taken down

      This one they lost and it happened last year

      read the description for the full details.

      For the ellen degenrees one

      https://www.reddit.com/r/videos/comments/43e6a9/link_inside_in_2014_the_fine_bros_told_its/

      They attacked ellen for what they think was a similar concept, showing kids old tech.

      fun fact before elders react, there was an earlier series called seniors react that was mysteriously taken down, read all about it

      https://www.reddit.com/r/videos/comments/43fdw3/seniors_react_originally_posted_apr_3_2012_was/

      There are plenty more but im lazy, so find em yourself.

      And here are 6 of the trademark applications not including the other 3 or 4 shows

      http://www.tmfile.com/owner/fi/fine-brothers-properties,inc28.php

      The word REACT is number 3.

      For paper work for the word react here is a closer look :

      http://tsdr.uspto.gov/documentviewer?caseId=sn86689364&docId=NOP20160113074621#docIndex=1&page=1

      And an attorney reacting

      http://ryanmorrisonlaw.com/attorneys-react-the-fine-bros-react-trademark/

      • Joe Joejoe

        On top of that, their 'Elders React' series is stolen from another Youtuber who did it before them under the name of 'Seniors React'. Needless to say, even though they were doing it first, Fine Bros copyright claimed the channel into oblivion, and now it simply doesn't exist anymore.

        There have been hundreds of videos taken down in just the past 48 hours due to the react trademark. And all of them didn't use any of the narrow 'React' format the Fine Bros claim to be trademarking. Instead, they're covering a broader spectrum of nearly all react videos.

        They're going after the little guys who have no voice, and staying away from most of the big guys for now because they know that if they piss off channels like Buzzfeed, they will really be on the losing end because Buzzfeed is even bigger than them and would run them soo deep through the courts that the Fine Bros would go bankrupt in the process.

        The Fine Bros have 30 days of public challenge time left to stop their trademark, that's why they are lying blatantly to mislead the public.

        • Faxe Jensen

          Oh, bull!

        • Pretty Panther

          Lol.

      • Faxe Jensen

        That video was taken down for an unrelated reason. Failure to comply with Fair Use of another creators content. Even Fine Bros have to cut out parts of the videos they use, if they haven't obtained permissions from the creators.

    • Andy Smith

      This is definitely going to be a humbling experience for these guys. Quite honestly it may end up great for the community as a whole and force YouTube to focus on some more rules around how Content ID works and is often abused.

    • http://www.thelionsdennews.com Andy Smith

      I think that's more a function of content ID. At least I hope they aren't manually claiming against these people for stuff that appears to be pretty cut and dried fair use. But with them retracting basically everything, I think they realized it was more important for them to side with their fans/other creators, as they protect their brand more than a couple trademarks will.

  • nlpnt

    I think the Fine Bros started out early enough that nobody imagined someone could get as big as they are now *within YouTube*, didn't have the foresight to pick a more distinct name than "(subcategory of humans) React", and are now stuck with trying to make a near-generic term for a well-trodden category of video "work" as a trademark.

    • Andy Smith

      Now that these trademarks have come to light before being finalized/registered, I think they are going to have a heck of a time getting "react" through the system. The others may very well pass through though.

    • http://www.thelionsdennews.com Andy Smith

      I'm thankful they are learning from their mistakes and not me. Although they are taking quite the hit, they are learning a valuable lesson for all creators on the wrong path for video creators to take.

  • http://ZachBussey.com/ Zach

    I fully understand they are protecting their brand and want to do other exciting things with it... but while this is the way traditional media would do things, YouTube has always been about breaking down barriers to creation - not putting them up. That's what the community has been built on.

    There have been a number of channels that have come out in the last 48 hours saying they've had 'Reaction' based videos taken down - one channel had 8 views on the video (saw it after it was reposted, and it was not a Fine Brothers rip). If that's the standard being set, that's a scary one.

    I also find it ironic that the only channel taking legal action to protect their brand to continue to create content is one that relies on other people's content to create their brand.

    • chosensimac

      Two things worth nothing. Does two videos taken down were not because they used the word "react" in the title. It was because it used their footage. Also, there's no hard proof that they took anything down. It might have been fullscreen acting independently.

      • http://ZachBussey.com/ Zach

        React videos in general usually use other people's content to make them a thing.

        • J-Pat

          Exactly. They are hypocrites. Greedy, goofy as fuck looking hypocrites.

        • Faxe Jensen

          IN FAIR USE!
          You can't just show the whole thing without permission. You have to cut it down to Fair Use extents. Most reactors are aware of this.
          Failure to follow this WILL result in YouTube's automatic system taking down your video. That means this is NOT a trademark related issue!

        • http://ZachBussey.com/ Zach

          Yes, I'm well aware of what fair use is. I apply it often to my own videos so I know the requirements.

          The point is, the spirit of fair use and the spirit of copyrighting the word 'react' fly in the face of each other.

        • Nettacki

          *Trademarking. Not copyrighting. There's a difference.

        • http://ZachBussey.com/ Zach

          True - I misspoke. But the end result is the same.

          Jukin owns 'People Are Awesome' and took down DevinSupertramps video recently, and he had no way to resolve the issue.

        • Faxe Jensen

          So does making blatant rip-offs of REACT... Which has happened. That is why they took this road.

        • http://ZachBussey.com/ Zach

          Which Fine Brother is this?

        • Faxe Jensen

          And there's the cop-out.

        • http://ZachBussey.com/ Zach

          Actually that's what's called a joke - glad to see you're as ridiculous as you sound.

        • Faxe Jensen

          Sooo... That's another joke?
          I apologize if I didn't catch the first one. I have some history with conspiracy theorists, and the one thing that always comes up when debating them, is that they accuse you of being a part of the conspiracy.

    • Andy Smith

      I'm hoping the videos that have been taken down are more a result of the inefficiencies of the Content ID system, because flagging videos the way some of these have been flagged is a reprehensible practice.

    • http://www.thelionsdennews.com Andy Smith

      It's interesting to see they are releasing all claims they currently have out right now, according to their post. I'm curious how many were manually created and how many are as a result of the inefficient content ID system.

  • http://diabeticcookbookblog.com Adam Garcia

    Here's the problem with all of this. Everyone who has responded to this in a negative, anger-like attitude is doing so because they fear what this could mean. The removal of channels and videos would be a fearful moment for me. This is the reason for the backlash. All anger is based in fear. In fact, all negativity is based in the emotion of fear. There are unanswered questions that people are unaware or ignorant of. Andy you stated that, "Relative to creators, I can say with certainty that I personally believe FBE is doing this with all of the right intentions." I agree with you completely. They are absolutely doing this with the right intentions. They prove it through their Update video. They have actually apologized for miscommunication and are doing their best to answer questions as thoroughly as possible. If I were them I would screencast the emails and add them to an FAQ on a support site, specifically for the purpose of directing similar emailed questions there. I would also add them to YouTube and add them to a playlist specifically to protect their reputation further. Now, regardless whether they continue to do this or not there will be a loss in subscriber base. In fact, I wouldn't doubt if they have seen a loss in subscribers already. However, doing what I stated above would help them to protect their reputation, as well as minimize their loss of subscribers.

    • Mandy

      Shut up you shill. If they want to trademark "Fine Bro's (BLANK) React" that makes sense, but the Trademark application shouldn't have even made it this far.

    • Andy Smith

      I fear all of that anger has snowballed out of control at this point. It may almost be better for them to take a 30 day break from all social media outlets completely and hope this blows over.

    • http://www.thelionsdennews.com Andy Smith

      They lost a ton from this whole fiasco. So much so that they announced a cancellation of their trademarks yesterday, along with the React World project.

  • http://smart-video.tv smart video

    I think you guys should liscence "reelseo react" 😉

    • Andy Smith

      I'm sure Carla knows the first thing I'd ask her to react to.

      • Carla Marshall

        Is it that stupid Christmas movie?

        • Andy Smith

          Oh 100% yes!

    • http://www.thelionsdennews.com Andy Smith

      I know exactly what I'd make our editor watch first!