Humour, Emotion and UGC: Food Industry Video Trends For 2013

Humour, Emotion and UGC: Food Industry Video Trends For 2013

Food blogging and vlogging is a serious business and gives a voice to those consumers who want to work with, talk about, have fun with and critique the food industry in order to understand their place in it. There are literally hundreds of thousands of posts, pages and videos being uploaded and shared every single day around the subject of food - never has the manufacturing and production of our daily bread been so up for discussion.

With ever increasing consumer demand to know what goes into the food we eat, brands are falling over themselves to tell us how much they care about our welfare and to let a bit of light in on the magic, as much as they want us to see anyway. A new report from VAN takes us through some of the video marketing campaigns that the major food brands have created in 2013 and why they have worked so well for them.

How Oreo And KitKat Tapped Into Humour And Fan Loyalty

Confectionery brands have tended to focus on the fun surrounding their product rather than the nutritional benefits of candy - of which there are very little, let's be honest. Oreo and Kitkat have been the big winners this year with their inspired and amusing campaigns for their yummy treats. Oreo started their digital advertising year with a massive Super Bowl win for both their ad and their whip smart response to the power outage, but it was their series of mockumentary style 'Separator' ads that garnered a combined 5 million views. Why did these ads become so popular? Oreo recognised that their fans fell into two categories when it came to eating the cookies so, in the most affectionate way possible, they set both sides up against each other. It worked because it generated conversations across social media and consumers were encouraged to interact not only with the brand but with each other. The fact that the videos were released in instalments gave the campaign extra mileage and ensured the set of four achieved a share ratio of 1 to every 31 views.

Last month, Nestle teamed up with Google after the search engine giant announced their new Android OS would be called 'KitKat'. Nestle rebranded KitKat's Facebook, Google + and Twitter pages to reflect the partnership and they also released a spoof video promoting the deal, which killed two birds with one stone by taking a wipe at Apple's OS at the same time. The video did well because Nestle capitalised on the hype surrounding the release of the iPhone 5s and the buzz around the KitKat/Google hook up. The ad attracted 30,000 shares in the first 24 hours and subsequently achieved 77 shares for each view it received.   

How The Emotive Approach Worked Wonders For Chipotle And Cheerios

The Scarecrow, Chipotle's animated video set out to distance the company from the cruelty of factory farming methods and seems to have hit a note with consumers as it attracted over 7 million views in just 5 weeks. The ad, designed to promote the brand's iOS app game, appealed to a wide demographic and the use of haunting music and off the scale production values helped push it much further than a potentially more hard hitting approach could have achieved. There's been a backlash but the ad has still seen 45 shares for every play.

Cheerios released an ad back in May 2013 that featured an interracial family and attracted such hateful YouTube comments from some sections of society that the brand had to remove thousands of them and also turn off the feature. The aftermath of this was discussed far and wide for months after and spawned many user generated responses. It achieved 94 shares across social media for every view. Comments are still disabled for this video.

Food Related User Generated And Non Branded Videos Also Have Viral Potential

It isn't just branded food content that does well on YouTube, USG and non-branded clips are a hugely successful genre too with views into the millions and an impressive number of social shares per play. Channels like My Cupcake Addiction and Nick's Kitchen attract a loyal following with subscribers in the hundreds of thousands and view counts in the millions. The creation of fun, informational and entertaining non-branded content and the success that has on YouTube sends a powerful message to brands that they need to bring something new to the table in terms of video marketing. Consumers do not respond well to being sold to or talked at but tap into their concerns or tickle their funny bone and you could be onto a winner.

Humour, Emotion and UGC: Food Industry Video Trends For 2013

You can see the full report in the following presentation:

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About the Author -
Carla Marshall is the Managing Editor of ReelSEO, and the Community Manager for the ReelSEO YouTube Channel. She is YouTube Certified, and specializes in video optimization and organic marketing. View All Posts By -

What do you think? ▼
  • Studio-C by Matter

    Thanks for the article and these examples! We've been trying to push our food clients in the same direction as of late - these success stories will come in handy. Here's an example of a two-part short video series we did for our client Sea Cuisine with Top Chef Stefan Richter: http://youtu.be/Z54L0unlKFs Food is fun!

  • Judie Russell

    Great article. Thanks. I made a stop motion animation for a local preserve producer. A lot of time and effort went into it and I was really happy with how it turned out but it hasn't received many views. If any of you have a chance I'd love to hear your opinions on why that is: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wazuKgFE6HU
    Thanks a million!

    • Ken Fisher

      Probably because the video doesn't have any semblance of an attractive title or what people are interested in. Stick "wholesome foods" in there and I'm sure the traffic will at least double. "Eating Well" too. Same is true of your current website title unless the brand is well known...I don't know.

      "Folláin - Home Page"

      Nice video!

      • Judie Russell

        Thanks a million Ken! Really appreciate the feedback!