Canon 5D Mark III: The Ultimate Feature Request List for DSLR Video

Canon 5D Mark III: The Ultimate Feature Request List for DSLR Video

For little more than a year now, I have been making video marketing productions using two Canon DSLRs as my weapon of choice: a 5D mark II (for its ability to do bokeh-porn) and the 7D (for those smooth Glidecam shots at 50 or 60 frames per second). Although both Panasonic (AF100) and Sony (F3) are introducing affordable ($5k and $15k respectively) new cameras that take in some of the best aspects of DSLRs, it's time to wonder what route Canon should take with its forthcoming DSLR successor to the Canon 5D mark II: the Canon 5D mark III.

Already, the Canon 5D mark III (or will it be called the 6D?) is on the India edition of PC World's most awaited cameras list. Since the 5D mark II was introduced two years ago, the new breed of DSLRs may very well be announced at NAB (in April), but surely we should expect to see them in the shops by IBC and PhotoKina (in September).

But what are the top features we would like to see in the next generation? Here it is: an ultimate wishlist of features for the 5D mark III.

Canon 5D Mark III: The Ultimate Feature Request List for DSLR Video Keep the form factor

I love DSLRs. No surprise there. I love them for the image quality that you can achieve with them, but I especially like the form factor. They are incredibly small, which allows me to travel with two or more bodies at the same time. Compare that to a 'proper' sized video camera with a humongous video lens attached to it. Not only are you carrying more weight, traditional video cameras are also much more mistrusted by the general audience. People behave differently when they know a camera crew is present. Not so for still photographers. Whenever I shoot in public places, almost everyone thinks I am shooting stills, not video. Often, people will pose for my camera, waiting for that click-noise from the shutter. I usually let them keep that pose for about 5-10 seconds and just when they start to wonder why they don't hear any click, I tell them that I am shooting video. At that point they relax, laugh and give you the best natural looking footage you can dream of (and use in your edit).

Altogether, Canon should definately NOT take the route Panasonic and Sony have taken. In other words: keep the form factor the way it is. Nice and small. Instead, Canon should allow for external add-ons to complement the camera with extra features that DSLR shooters require (more on that below). Much like the BG-E6 battery grip that adds extra power (and weight for stability), Canon could create similar add-ons for recording uncompressed video or allowing for XLR-inputs.

Canon 5D Mark III: The Ultimate Feature Request List for DSLR Video

The small form factor also allows me to easily mount the camera to a Glidecam for ultra-smooth moving camera shots. This would not be as easy with a much heavier piece of gear. Many of the shots in the video below would not be as attainable:

Since the majority of these cameras are sold to a different market than DSLR shooters that use it for filmmaking (that is, the photographers that use it for stills), Canon will most likely continue to focus on development of features for this market. Righteously so, I like to add. The power of DSLRs already lies in the ability to interchange lenses as you please (and thus have a shooting range from 8 to 500mm). Being able to extend this with additional components allows for more wider use. Look at RED's building blocks and learn.

Canon 5D Mark III: The Ultimate Feature Request List for DSLR Video Maintain Full-frame sensors

The recent arrival of the Panasonic AF-100 has given rise to the notion that micro 4/3rd sensors are the way forward. I truly hope Canon will not follow that route. The bad thing about micro 4/3rd is that it gives a whopping 2.0 crop factor to existing 35mm glass. Also, Panasonic does not provide particularly fast glass itself, as Stu Maschwitz concluded earlier. And fast glass with at least a constant aperture is what we need to achieve beautiful shots. Sure, you can mount PL or compact primes to the Panny as well, but that won't solve the crop.

The video from Panasonic above compares the size of the sensor to 35mm film cameras versus 35mm still cameras. However, it does not discuss the crop factor. Yet, with a crop factor of 2, all of a sudden your nice-n-wide 24mm becomes a not-so-wide 48mm. Smaller sensors may be cheaper but the existing breed of cropped-sensor sizes of the 1D mark IV (1.3 crop factor) or 7D (1.6 crop factor) is enough for my taste. Combined with a 2x extender, I can turn my 70-200mm F2.8 into a 224-640mm F5.6 on my 7D (loosing two stops of light in the process), so there is no real need for further cropping to narrow my field-of-view.

Instead, the Canon 5D mark III should continue to have a full-frame sensor, meaning that your 24mm remains a 24mm. The real investment for any DSLR shooter is in the glass and one would expect this to last for the lifetime of multiple bodies.

Although full-frame sensors are harder to focus, they also provide a type of bokeh-porn from the shallow depth-of-field that you can't achieve with any other affordable camera. In the words of Stu Maschwitz:

Quite simply, we have tasted full-retard DOF, and it is good."

By the way, being able to shoot shallow depth-of-field does not mean that you should. One of the most famous movies of all-time, Citizen Kane, was known for its use of deep focus. But, at least, with a full-frame sensor and fast 35mm glass, you can achieve that shallow DOF, whereas with a small-chip video camera, you can only shoot deep focus. It's all about having options and using the tools wisely and with proper effect.

Canon 5D Mark III: The Ultimate Feature Request List for DSLR Video

Canon 5D Mark III: The Ultimate Feature Request List for DSLR Video Provide clean HDMI out

The current breed of DSLR cameras record footage in a highly compressed format, using the H.264 codec. This means that a lot of information gets thrown out and is therefore no longer available for post production image manipulation.

Being stills cameras, the DSLRs already do allow for RAW image recording, albeit for the stills function only. In terms of speed, they allow for between 3.9 (5D mark II) and 8 (7D) frames per second in consecutive RAW (CR2) images:

  • Canon EOS 5D mark II at 21 Megapixels and a resolution of 5616x3744 pixels
  • Canon EOS 7D at 18 Megapixels and a resolution of 5184x3456 pixels

If Canon would be able to handle the heat that these sensors generate they might be able to up that to 24-25 frames per second, thus giving you a camera that shoots RAW video. One thing is for sure - for video purposes they don't have to move the mirror 25 times a second.

However, the truth is that today's de facto video resolution is not 5k, 3k or even 2k - it is FullHD, or 1920x1080 pixels. Something you might call a 2k sub-standard, since true 2k is 2048x1080 pixels. Most digital theaters have 2k projectors, while the typical home cinema displays only support FullHD at best.

Canon 5D Mark III: The Ultimate Feature Request List for DSLR VideoImage source: Wikipedia

Therefore, a better route than trying to shoot 24 or 25 consecutive RAW images per second would be for Canon to provide a clean HDMI out-signal and allow for external recorders to record the image. Again, these could be from external companies, or as a nice bolt-on package from Canon itself. Below are images of two notable products, the Ki Pro Mini and the Ninja from Atomos:

Canon 5D Mark III: The Ultimate Feature Request List for DSLR Video

And by clean HDMI out signal, I mean clean. The image should not have any On Screen Display functions. More importantly, however, Canon should optimize this 5k-to-2k translation process and then allow for an external device (or: their own add-on) to record the image, instead of the camera's on-board recording function. The latter would cause the DLSR to overheat in a very short timespan, something an external device could handle better.

Recently, I read an excellent article on FreshDV from Matthew Jeppsen entitled "RAW video - be careful what you wish for", which discusses the pros and cons of adding RAW video to DSLRs. Another important issue with RAW video recording is the ability to process the images in the edit. Most current video editing systems are not fit for handling 5k images. Anyone who has ever tried to make a timelapse from RAW CR2 files knows how much of a strain this puts on your computer's resources (Adobe After Effects CS5 handles it remarkably well). Although RAW allows for tons of more options for image manipulation in post, it also comes at a cost. As Jeppsen correctly concludes:

Given a choice between H.264 and a substantially more space-hogging codec on a DSLR, I would probably still choose H.264 most of the time. Which is why the only "raw video" I want Canon to add in the next DSLR is a proper HDMI output. That would give me all the "RAW" options I'd need, for the handful of times I'd have to use it.

Aside from enabling a clean HDMI out, Canon should also allow for a variable setting of the bit-rate at which the H.264 codec operates. Already, the guys at Magic Lantern have shown that these cameras are able to go upto 70Mbps, thus giving you far less compression and more information to work with in post production.

Canon 5D Mark III: The Ultimate Feature Request List for DSLR Video Proper audio in- and outputs (and monitoring)

Much akin to traditional cinema, using a dual audio system is the safest route to good results with a DSLR. The on-board audio just cannot be trusted for professional audio quality. Sure, you can attach a Beachtek with XLR inputs (and an audio output), but there is no way for you to monitor the audio output on the camera itself. If you attach your headphones to the AV-out on the camera you will not get audio output and instead loose your video signal on the LCD screen. So there is no way for you to know if the audio is properly recorded on the DSLR. As the hackers from Magic Lantern have shown, Canon could instantly enable audio monitoring through a simple firmware upgrade.

Until the March 2010 firmware upgrade, which gave us 24/25p and manual audio, the Canon 5D mark II only had audio with a bismal Auto Gain Control (AGC), a feature the Canon 7D still has. After the upgrade, Canon did enable the setting of manual audio levels, but this feature is buried so deep inside the menu, that you cannot access it whilst recording, let alone change its settings easily.

The next breed of Canons should allow for on-board monitoring of audio via the AV-out (you will use the HDMI connector for video output anyway) and allow for an add-on box featuring two balanced XLR inputs on the L and R channels. Again, could be from Beachtek or as a battery-style grip from Canon itself.

Canon 5D Mark III: The Ultimate Feature Request List for DSLR Video Lens upgrades

Although the Canon L-Series glass is of phenomenally great quality and speed, it has two main drawbacks: the focus ring and the lack of manual aperture control. In short, these are stills lenses and they were made for — stills.

Canon 5D Mark III: The Ultimate Feature Request List for DSLR Video

First, the focus ring was made for electronic, not manual control. In order for the brain inside the camera to get focus fast, the amount of travel on the focus ring is kept to a minimum distance. Although great when shooting stills in auto focus mode, this tight focus throw makes maintaining focus on moving subjects when shooting video more of a challenge. A larger lens throw would be wellcomed. Such larger focus travels can be found on the CP2 Compact Primes series from Zeiss, which feature a 330° throw.

Second, aperture - or F-Stop - can only be controlled from the camera body, not on a separate ring on the lens itself. Instead of allowing for the aperture blades to smoothly open or close down, this feature is controlled electronically with noticeable clicks: the shortest range possible is with a 1/3rd stop setting. Noticeable, since you will see the stopping down (from say F2.8 to F5.6) in your recorded image and there is little you can do to fix that to a smooth curve in post production. Older lenses from the seventies used to have a aperture ring on the lens, although I am not sure how smooth these could be controlled.

Manual control of aperture is a desired feature when shooting video. If you move the camera from a very dark to a very light room, you want the transition to be as smooth as possible. Also, it allows you to enlarge the focal plane, provided you have some control over the incoming light at the same time.

Another thing video lenses have as a benefit over stills lenses is the ability to remotely control zoom and focus. Especially when the camera is mounted on a crane or a steadicam, remote control is a key issue. Traditional video cameras have an on-board control mechanism for this - a LANC. DSLRs, on the other hand, require the addition of external motors to control these two lens rings.

If Canon were to allow for a series of lenses that feature a) a larger throw of the focus ring, b) smooth manual aperture control and c) a LANC-like control function, they would appeal to a new market of video enthusiasts and filmmakers alike. Canon could learn a lot from the popular Zeiss CP2 Compact Primes series which retail at premium prices. For me, this would be a reason to sell my current primes and upgrade my glass.

Fix Moire & Rolling Shutter

In order to go from an image captured by the sensor at full frame resolution (5616x3744 pixels) to a FullHD image (1920x1080 pixels), the Canon DSLRs use an algorithm that is not very precise. The current sensor processes the image in such a way that lines are skipped. This is causing moire. In other words, pure nastiness. Trying to shoot repetitive patterns, such as a brick house or a shirt with fine lines quickly introduces those funky, radiating patterns which cannot be easily fixed in post either. Unless you like frame-by-frame painting ;-). Canon should therefore improve this translation process.

One problem persist, though: the stills guys want Canon to up their game in the Megapixel race. Some rumors exists that the Canon 5D mark III will feature an upgrade from 21 to 28 Megapixel. If that translates into higher resolution, the translation to FullHD may even become a bigger challenge. Guess we'll have to wait and see how the new camera handles this.

Another issue has to do with the way CMOS sensors record the image. Unlike a CCD-chip, they start at the top and proceed towards the bottom. What happens when you record a fast-moving image (e.g. a bus passing by a steady camera or a whip-panning camera on a set of straight lines), is called Rolling Shutter.

Although there is a way to fix this with a plugin by The Foundry, Canon could fix this by allowing multiple CMOS chips to work on the image at the same time, hence reducing the time difference between the top and the bottom parts of the image. The Canon 5D mark III is rumored to have dual Digic-IV sensors (the 5D only has one), so that will hopefully help solve this problem once and for all.

Various other neat functions

Traditional video users are accustomed to various features that help when shooting, such as Zebra marks that indicate the extend to which your whites are clipping. Although I do not really miss such a feature, I can imagine this to add value for others. Again, Canon could learn a lot from the Magic Lantern firmware hack. Alternatively, the forthcoming electronic viewfinder, or EVF from companies like Zacuto and Red Rock Micro are likely to have such a feature integrated.

Aside from Zebras, a really neat feature would be the ability to digitally zoom in whilst recording. Currently, you can use the 5x and 10x zoom button on the back of the camera to check focus before hitting the record button. Use of this feature during a recording session would allow you to re-check focus. Of course, the zooming in would not need to be recorded on the flash card.

Another useful feature would be a short-cut button that allows you to see a short review (5 seconds) of the last recorded clip. Something pro-sumer level video camera's provide and can help you frame up your next shot.

Finally, an A-B setting mode to automatically rack focus between object A and object B would be a nice addition. This is already common in most (semi-)professional video cameras.

Conclusion

It will be interesting to see which features Canon is able to implement from the list above. One should not forget that Canon will continue to sell these as stills cameras to the photography community and that they have different demands than DSLR shooters. Some photographers I know rely on auto focus to a great extend, while I tend to operate these cameras almost exclusively in manual mode.

Also, Canon has to deal with the internal issue of having a professional video department that sells small-sensor-big-form-factor cameras to the prosumer and professional markets. These are the people that may consider using DSLRs, especially if they start to look and work more like video cameras. Given that you pay about $7000-8000 for a Canon 1/2inch chip video camera (standard video lens included) and only $3000 for a DSLR body and nice L-Series Zoom lens, it's not hard to do the math. On the other hand, if Canon were to take an approach of add-ons, as suggested in this article, the total spend on the camera could easily go up. Plus, people will be more likely to build-up a range of lenses with DSLRs than with video cameras, which is more profitable for Canon.

Also, the unexpected popularity of DSLRs over the past few years has given rise to a whole ecosystem of manufacturers that make complementary products. Canon should embrace this and nurtur it. If your product constitutes an ecosystem, you can be right at the center of it all.

Taken together, I do hope that Canon will listen to its users and give them what they want (and, perhaps, need). The Canon 5D mark II was the best thing that ever happened to Canon, so please let the mark III (or 6D?) be even better than that.

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About the Author -
Richard van den Boogaard is a freelance cameraman, editor and video marketing consultant based in the Netherlands. With his company, Branded Channels, he creates branded content with high production value, using his own state-of-the-art gear. Recent productions can be seen on Vimeo. View All Posts By -

What do you think? ▼
  • chrismingryan

    Excellent post. Thanks for getting these issues out there!

    • Richard Van Den Boogaard

      Chris, you're welcome... Do shoot with a DSLR as well?

      • chrismingryan

        I have been shooting with a GH1 and I've produced/directed stuff with 5D and 7D.

  • http://twitter.com/jimmfox jimmfox

    Great post Richard. Please make sure this is forwarded to the braintrust at Canon.

    • Richard Van Den Boogaard

      Thanks. I did forward it to one of my contacts at Canon. See what comes out it...

      • http://www.reelseo.com/ Mark Robertson

        great, maybe they can work with us to donate or let us borrow the next model so we can do a review? That;s something Id like to start doing.

  • http://www.facebook.com/poederbach Tom Poederbach

    Good article! One thing I like to stress which I high lighted myself in an article in Broadcast Magazine 299 in the Netherlands and that is recording media and writing speed. If we look at the Ikonoskop Dll we see a good solution for shooting RAW. Take all the math out of the camera and only store the RAW image in camera, as you sugested for HDMI recording on a separate recording device. All the math can be done in post. Just process the images before editing, there are already various software applications that can do this. Recording RAW using the CinemaDNG standard an initiative of Adobe which takes all math out of your recording device and keep the form factor of the camera small. Otherwise your camera gets much more expensive and bigger ( Alexa and full blown EPIC) due to all kinds of extra cooling mechanisems needed. Having said this, I personally favour the idea that each typ of job requires its own camera type depending on what your image needs to look like and how you distribute your work, web or big screen and what budget there is available. A new Canon with full sensor with all the bells and whistles will be as expensive as the RED Epic (not the Epic S) around 20K €. In your article you already mentioned Stu, he made the Field of View Simulator and you should have mentioned Abelcine's Field of View Calculator too. (http://gallery.me.com/prolost and http://www.abelcine.com/fov/) The FOV Simulator give you a simulation showing you a full 35mm film CU shot as a standard and how you can obtain a similar shot using al kinds of DSLR and video cameras and the lenses with the corresponding focal point, aperture stop and FOV angles or crop factor. All very clear and very interesting. Your bokeh and viewing angle depend purely on F-stop and crop factor. How much Cinema would you like to have? Just look it up.

    Tom

  • http://www.facebook.com/poederbach Tom Poederbach

    Good article! One thing I like to stress which I high lighted myself in an article in Broadcast Magazine 299 in the Netherlands and that is recording media and writing speed. If we look at the Ikonoskop Dll we see a good solution for shooting RAW. Take all the math out of the camera and only store the RAW image in camera, as you sugested for HDMI recording on a separate recording device. All the math can be done in post. Just process the images before editing, there are already various software applications that can do this. Recording RAW using the CinemaDNG standard an initiative of Adobe which takes all math out of your recording device and keep the form factor of the camera small. Otherwise your camera gets much more expensive and bigger ( Alexa and full blown EPIC) due to all kinds of extra cooling mechanisems needed. Having said this, I personally favour the idea that each typ of job requires its own camera type depending on what your image needs to look like and how you distribute your work, web or big screen and what budget there is available. A new Canon with full sensor with all the bells and whistles will be as expensive as the RED Epic (not the Epic S) around 20K €. In your article you already mentioned Stu, he made the Field of View Simulator and you should have mentioned Abelcine's Field of View Calculator too. (http://gallery.me.com/prolost and http://www.abelcine.com/fov/) The FOV Simulator give you a simulation showing you a full 35mm film CU shot as a standard and how you can obtain a similar shot using al kinds of DSLR and video cameras and the lenses with the corresponding focal point, aperture stop and FOV angles or crop factor. All very clear and very interesting. Your bokeh and viewing angle depend purely on F-stop and crop factor. How much Cinema would you like to have? Just look it up.

    Tom

    • Richard Van Den Boogaard

      Thanks Tom. Very valuable advice. Spot on.

  • http://twitter.com/planetMitch planetMitch

    Awesome post and much of it right on. We did a poll of HDSLR users and posted the results on our blog... Top 5 HDSLR ‘must have’ features moviemakers want in the next pro HDSLR
    Posted - http://blog.planet5d.com/2010/12/top-5-hdslr-must-have-features-moviemakers-want-in-the-next-pro-hdslr/

    • Richard Van Den Boogaard

      Thanks, I just read the post. That improved autofocus system HAS to be the top-feature from photographers, not videographers. That is, those videographers that have been trained the professional way. I never trust automatic features - unless the camera as intelligent as my own brain...

  • RealDeuce

    FYI, regarding "Older lenses from the seventies used to have a aperture ring on the lens, although I am not sure how smooth these could be controlled", those lenses usually had click-stops but almost all of them can have those removed by simply removing the aperture control ring, removing a single ball bearing, then reassembling. About a two minute job... and there have been manual lenses built through the 90s (and a handfull still going strong today).

    • Richard Van Den Boogaard

      Thanks for the advice. Today I have had a chance to play with a Zeiss compact prime mounted on the Panasonic AF-101 (a 28mm --> effectively a 56mm) and this is really a sweet lens with ultra-smooth manual aperture control on the lens itself. It allowed me to keep the light acceptable while tilting from a sun-lit church clock to a street in almost full shadow. So sweet. The lens through (330 degree) on the focus ring is almost impossible to manage if you focus from a very close to a very distant object in a single take.

      Nonetheless, the added features on the AF101, makes me really want to get one... I intend to use it for interview-purposes (on-board audio recording, at last) and for use on a jib. I just need to get some additional assignments and I'm good to go...

  • Generic

    One more improvement could be to modify the file system to not limit the file sizes to 4GB. (roughly 12 mins). Perhaps from FAT32 to NTFS or something like it.

    • Richard Van Den Boogaard

      That's probably not going to happen. It is a restriction that is built-in for tax-purposes. If they were to go beyond this limit, it would be regarded as a video camera, with higher tax levies as a result.

      I have been shooting with DSLRs for more than a year now, and I have never found the 12 mins limit a problem. 80% of my shots are 8-10 seconds and for those interviews that I shoot, a quick pause whenever the interviewer asks a question (which usually doesn't make it to the edit) and re-hit on the record button solves that problem instantly...

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_MSZN2RCRPWJB2KTF7WEQKNEOK4 Danny Young

        The Panasonic micro 4/3rds GH2 a DSLR can run over 60 minutes plus depending on the configuration.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_MSZN2RCRPWJB2KTF7WEQKNEOK4 Danny Young

      Yes, extending the file system would be a great improvement. I routinely video classical choral performances which demand that no breaks can occur and too many times the file system will not allow this to happen.

  • Barry Fontaine

    You're trying to turn the DSLR into a broadcast video camera or a RED. Don't. It is what it is, and that's a great still camera with gimmicky video camera capabilities.

    • http://twitter.com/BrandedChannel Richard vd Boogaard

      True, it IS indeed gimmicky to work with. But what you're saying is that innovation should stop. I totally disagree with that. Canon has democratized film making like no other company has done before. Although unintentional at first, they should not stop this revolution they've started...

  • Barry Fontaine

    If you want a great VIDEO CAMERA look at what Sony is working on?

    Sony
    SRW-9000PL HDCAM-SR Camcorder
    Super 35mm-sized CCDPL Lens Mount1080p / 1080i24p, 25p, 29.97p, 50p, 60p4:2:2 10-bit CaptureRGB 4:4:4 with Optional Board880Mbps / 440Mbps RecordingS-Gamut Color SpaceISO 800 Mode Gamma CurveHD-SDI Output

    • http://twitter.com/BrandedChannel Richard vd Boogaard

      Probably great, but at a price point anywhere between $60-125k this is nowhere near what us DSLR shooters can afford...

  • http://twitter.com/Faustomatic Faustomatic Photo

    "Canon could fix this by allowing multiple CMOS chips to work on the image at the same time, hence reducing the time difference between the top and the bottom parts of the image. The Canon 5D mark III is rumored to have dual Digic-IV sensors (the 5D only has one), so that will hopefully help solve this problem once and for all."

    I think you're confused here. This wouldn't be two CMOS sensors. Digic processors process the info from the sensor. The 1D Mk4 uses two Digic 4 processors to process information from it's APS-H(1.3x crop) sensor and still has rolling shutter issues.

  • doesntfitinatag

    How about utilizing the full resolution of the sensor and the full processing power of a new digic 5 chip to create Full HD at 60p coming from 21 or above merged megapixels? Rather than dumping 9/10th of the cmos pixel count and information right from the beginning at video mode? Wouldn't this result to a more accurate and even better low light performance?

  • doesntfitinatag

    How about utilizing the full resolution of the sensor and the full processing power of a new digic 5 chip to create Full HD at 60p coming from 21 or above merged megapixels? Rather than dumping 9/10th of the cmos pixel count and information right from the beginning at video mode? Wouldn't this result to a more accurate and even better low light performance?

  • Justin Hunting

    Let's not forget the lack of shadow detail and only having 720p resolution.

  • Owais

    Hi,
    Do any one tell me how much 5D mark iii cost?
    right now i m using mark iii, 60D & 5D mark ii
    and getting very awesome result.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=566021551 Mir Shamsul Alam Baboo

    Nice

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000031532137 Tinku Choudhury

    thx Mir Shamsul Alam Baboo vai.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000046579577 Adnan Touhid

    Kobe j tumi amar hobe.Sudhu amar.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=784868333 Giuliano Bekor

    love it
    Can't wait for PhotoKina (in September).
    how much better can it get.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id= Anonymous

    I love DSLR! Especialls the 7D and t2i. Check out www.habbycam.com for some great deals on awesome gear.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001280468608 Mangesh Patil

    jay maharastra

  • Jason Broaddus

    I don't care so much about the video features, but the actual photography part. I can't wait to see what happens with the Mark III.

  • Steve Juilianna

    Santa.... Want!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=766319475 Ifeanyi Charlie Ferrari

    photography is powerful.

  • Behzad

    News from the Canon5D mark 3 camera

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100002600208284 Pargat Singh

    very good

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1324643329 Alexis Evelyn

    wonderful

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1353458280 Adhi Artha

    need firmware Clear HDMI output for mark II pls.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100003189791054 Manoj Gupta

    I like this.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100002132821055 何曉河

    佳能5D Mark III終於出來了,真可謂“千呼萬喚始出來”。看介紹非常好,等一些用戶使用后的反映,再作決定是否購買。

  • Noel Lopez Fernandez

    Estoy esperando por la canon 5D mark 3

    • Abel Valdivia

      hasta yo :)

  • Andy Ahadiat

    wow! pricey!

    • Andy Ahadiat

      please God, let me prove winning this camera wont spoil me

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100002890956425 John Christopher Lim

    that's great! it's very interesting.

  • Colin Darkes

    Very interesting.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000578991138 Ritchie Hendren

      Looks amazing mate, i had to extend my ticket another 10 days Col, to much going on with the build and i want it right before i go, coming back begining of october for 6 months I will catch up with you then mate, Take care, Ritchie.

    • Colin Darkes

      Thanks buddy, take care see you next time around

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1819631101 Tan Wah Chay

    like

  • HARIKRISHNA HK

    best informationz... i have to understnd this festures and more about...thank you so much